UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-KSB

þ Annual report under Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006.

¨ Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 for the transition period from _____ to _____.

Commission File Number 0-8092
OXIS Logo
(Exact name of small business issuer as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
94-1620407
(I.R.S. employer
identification number)
 
323 Vintage Park Drive, Suite B, Foster City, CA 94404
(Address of principal executive offices and zip code)
(650) 212-2568
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act: NONE

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
Common Stock, $.001 par value

Check whether the issuer is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act. ¨

Check mark whether the issuer (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Exchange Act during the past 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES þ NO ¨

Check if there is no disclosure of delinquent filers in response to Item 405 of Regulation S-B contained in this form, and no disclosure will be contained, to the best of Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-KSB or any amendment to this Form 10-KSB. þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
YES ¨ NO þ

The issuer’s revenues for its fiscal year ended December 31, 2006 were $5,776,000.

Aggregate market value of the common equity held by non-affiliates of the issuer as of March 23, 2007 was $ 4,351,426.

Number of shares outstanding of the issuer’s common stock as of March 23, 2007: 44,527,476 shares.

 










TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART I
Page
Item 1.
Description of Business
2
Item 2.
Description of Property
18
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
19
Item 4.
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
19
PART II
Item 5.
Market for Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters
20
Item 6.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation
23
Item 6.
Risk Factors
40
Item 7.
Financial Statements
53
Item 8.
Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
54
Item 8A.
Controls and Procedures
54
Item 8B.
Other Information
54
PART III
Item 9.
Directors, Executive Officers, Promoters and Control Persons; Compliance with Section 16(a) of the Securities Exchange Act
55
Item 10.
Executive Compensation
58
Item 11.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
67
Item 12.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions
71
Item 13.
Exhibits
74
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
74
SIGNATURES
75
EXHIBIT INDEX
76






 

PART I

CAUTIONARY NOTICE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This annual report on Form 10-KSB and the documents incorporated by reference include “forward-looking statements.” To the extent that the information presented in this report discusses financial projections, information or expectations about our business plans, results of operations, products or markets, or otherwise makes statements about future events, such statements are forward-looking. Such forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “might,” “would,” “intends,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “projects,” “forecasts,” “expects,” “plans,” and “proposes.” Although we believe that the expectations reflected in these forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, there are a number of risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from such forward-looking statements. These include, among others, the cautionary statements in the “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis and Plan of Operation” sections of this report. These cautionary statements identify important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. When considering forward-looking statements in this report, you should keep in mind the cautionary statements in the “Risk Factors” section above and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation” section below, and other sections of this report.
 
The statements contained in this Registration Statement that are not purely historical are forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, including, without limitation, statements regarding our expectations, objectives, anticipations, plans, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future.

All forward-looking statements included in this document are based on information available to us on the date hereof, and we assume no obligation to update any such forward-looking statements. It is important to note that our actual results could differ materially from those included in such forward-looking statements. For a more detailed explanation of such risks, please see “Risk Factors” below. Such risks, as well as such other risks and uncertainties as are detailed in our SEC reports and filings for a discussion of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the forward-looking statements.

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and the notes included in this report on Form 10-KSB and the section entitled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in this report on Form 10-KSB.
 


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ITEM 1. DESCRIPTION OF BUSINESS

Recent Events

During 2006 and 2007 to date, we have been building our management team and enhancing our board of directors to bring effective leadership to our company.

On March 15, 2006, Gary M. Post, Managing Director of Ambient Advisors, LLC, joined our board of directors. On May 12, 2006, we entered into an engagement letter with Ambient Advisors LLC, or Ambient Advisors. Gary M. Post is the manager of Ambient Advisors. Ambient Advisors provided certain services pertaining to strategic planning, investor communications and financing strategies and other projects at the request of our chief executive officer for a one year period.

On October 12, 2006, we mutually agreed with Gary M. Post to terminate the engagement letter with Ambient Advisors LLC, effective October 15, 2006, and replace it with a new consulting agreement. On November 6, 2006, we entered into an advisory agreement with Ambient Advisors that commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006, or the Commencement Date. Ambient Advisors will provide certain services pertaining to strategic planning, financial planning and budgeting, investor relations, corporate finance and such additional roles and responsibilities as requested for a three year period from the Commencement Date, after this period on a year-to-year basis.

On September 15, 2006, Steven T. Guillen’s employment as President and Chief Executive Officer was terminated. Mr. Guillen remained a member of our board of directors.

Also on September 15, 2006, Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. was appointed by the board of directors as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company. Dr. Hausman remains Chairman of the board of directors. On November 6, 2006, we entered into an employment agreement with Dr. Hausman. The commencement date of our agreement with Dr. Hausman was set retroactively at October 15, 2006.

On November 6, 2006, we entered into a consulting agreement with John E. Repine, M.D., a member of our board of directors, which commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006. Dr. Repine will advise us concerning matters of antioxidant and inflammation research and potential acquisitions (including products, compounds, intellectual property, companies), product research and development, and the development and establishment of reference labs for oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions for a three year period from the commencement date of October 15, 2006, and after this period on a year-to-year basis.

On November 15, 2006, Michael D. Centron, Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, resigned and Dr. Hausman was appointed acting Chief Financial Officer.

On June 23, 2006, OXIS entered into a mutual services agreement with BioCheck. Both OXIS and BioCheck provide certain services to the other corporation to be charged monthly at an hourly rate with an overhead surcharge. The services that BioCheck provides under the agreement include assistance in manufacturing OXIS’ research assay test kits, assisting in packaging and shipping such research assay test kits to OXIS customers, and undertaking research and development of certain new OXIS research assay test kits on a case-by-case basis to be agreed upon between the parties. OXIS provides services to BioCheck, including marketing and sales, website management and materials requirement and control systems.

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On July 20, 2006, we entered into an amendment to the exclusive license and supply agreement originally signed on September 28, 2004 with HaptoGuard, Inc., which has since been merged into Alteon Inc. We granted Alteon three-month extensions to fulfill its obligation to begin Phase II clinical trials with a licensed product. Alteon may obtain three such extensions upon payment of $50,000 for each extension. In addition, we agreed to change the timeline for initiation of Phase IIb clinical trials with a licensed product under the license agreement and agreed to allow the same extension arrangement for that milestone.

On March 10, 2006, we received $200,000 in exchange for an unsecured promissory note with Steven T. Guillen, our president and chief executive officer at that time. The related party note bore interest at 7.0%. Interest and principal were due on September 10, 2006. Mr. Guillen’s employment was terminated on September 15, 2006. We were in default on this note at September 30, 2006. Subsequent to September 30, 2006, Mr. Guillen sued the Company for payment of interest and principal due under the note. On November 2, 2006, we repaid the principal and accrued interest due on the promissory note with Mr. Guillen in the amount of $209,000. The purpose of this loan was to provide us with short term financing as we sought longer term financing.

On March 31, 2006, we issued a $400,000 unsecured promissory note to Fagan Capital. Interest accrued at an annual rate of 8.0% and interest and principal were due on June 2, 2006. On July 26, 2006, Fagan Capital extended the maturity date of the promissory note to June 1, 2007 and we issued to Fagan Capital a warrant to purchase 1,158,857 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. On October 25, 2006, we prepaid the principal, accrued interest and legal fees due in the amount of $426,000. The purpose of this loan was to provide us with short term financing as we sought longer term financing.

On January 11, 2007, Matthew Spolar, Vice President, Product Technology for Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., was appointed to our board of directors.

        In March 2007, we retained Kevin Pickard, a certified public accountant, to provide management with support and assistance with regard to certain matters previously handled by Michael Centron, our former Chief Financial Officer.
  
In April 2007, we entered into an Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement with Alteon, Inc., under which we granted Alteon an exclusive, sole, worldwide license to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds covered by certain patent rights, with the right to sublicense. This license agreement amends and supersedes the Exclusive License and Supply Agreement previously entered into between OXIS and HaptoGuard, Inc. (now part of Alteon) on September 28, 2004, as amended. For additional details regarding this license agreement, see the section entitled “License Agreement with Alteon” on page 28 of this report.

On April 12, 2007, Steven T. Guillen resigned from our board of directors.
  
Recent Convertible Debenture and Warrant Financing
  
On October 25, 2006, we completed a $1,694,250 financing with four accredited investors, in which we issued convertible notes and warrants. The debentures are subject to an original issue discount of 20.318% resulting in proceeds to OXIS of $1,350,000 from the transaction. The debentures are convertible at a conversion price of $0.35 per share, and the warrants are exercisable at prices ranging from $0.35 to $0.385 per share, as adjusted pursuant to a full ratchet anti-dilution provision. The debentures mature on October 25, 2008 and are secured with substantially all of our assets. Further, the debentures are redeemable in cash or in stock (subject to certain conditions) on a monthly basis beginning on February 1, 2007. We filed a registration statement to cover the resale of the common stock underlying the debentures and warrants, on December 8, 2006, which was declared effective on February 12, 2007. For further details regarding the terms of this financing, refer to the section below entitled “Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities” on page 21 of this report.
  
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In the first quarter of 2007, monthly redemption payments of approximately $77,011 per month became due under the terms of the October 2006 debentures, on the first of each month beginning the first payment due on February 1, 2007. Under the terms of these debentures, we may elect to make the monthly redemption payments using our common stock based on a conversion price equal to the lesser of (i) the then-effective conversion price of the debentures ($0.35 per share), and (ii) 85% of the average of the volume-weighted average prices for the ten consecutive trading days immediately prior to the applicable monthly redemption date. In order to elect to pay the monthly redemption payments in stock, we must give 20 days prior notice and not be in default, among other conditions. Further, if we do not make the monthly redemption payments on a timely basis, an 18% penalty rate of interest applies to all late payments. At present, we have not made monthly redemption payments, and have accrued penalty interest. We are currently under negotiations with our debenture holders regarding a proposed agreement to make the February and March (and potentially other) monthly redemption payments in common stock. Assuming our stock is quoted at approximately $0.23 per share on a volume weighted average basis, we would have to issue approximately 329,000 shares of our common stock to the debenture holders per monthly redemption (which amount would be subject to change depending on the volume weighted average quoted price of our stock).

BioCheck Acquisition

On September 19, 2005, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with BioCheck, Inc., a privately held California corporation, or BioCheck, and its stockholders to purchase all of its common stock for $6.0 million in cash. For additional details regarding this transaction, refer to the description of the business of BioCheck on page 11 of this report.

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BUSINESS

Overview

OXIS International, Inc. focuses on the research and development of technologies and therapeutic products in the field of oxidative stress/inflammatory reaction. The company’s research agents, assays and therapeutic products have the potential to predict early disease development as well as treat conditions associated with oxidative stress/inflammatory reaction. The company’s present revenues are mostly derived from sales of diagnostic reagents and assays to medical research laboratories. Our diagnostic products include approximately 25 research reagents and assays to measure markers of oxidative stress and inflammation.   We also hold the rights to four therapeutic classes of anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory compounds. Specifically, one example of a potent antioxidant, is L-Ergothioneine, that may be appropriate for sale over-the-counter as a dietary supplement. We have acquired a 51% interest in and have the option to purchase the remaining 49% of BioCheck, Inc.

Our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, Inc. is a leading producer of clinical diagnostic assays, including high quality enzyme immunoassay research services and immunoassay kits for cardiac and tumor markers, infectious diseases, thyroid function, steroids, and fertility hormones designed to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of in vitro (outside the body) diagnostic testing in clinical laboratories. BioCheck focuses primarily on the immunoassay segment of the clinical diagnostics market. BioCheck offers over 40 clinical diagnostic assays manufactured in its 15,000 square foot, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, certified Good Manufacturing Practices device-manufacturing facility in Foster City, California.

It is the intent of management of both companies to use mutual diagnostic and clinical expertise and sales expertise of each company to maximize the value of their respective portfolios of reagents and diagnostic assays. Moreover, OXIS and BioCheck are collaborating in research and development relating to new predictive biomarker assays applicable to diseases in both humans and animals, and we expect this collaboration to continue.

We are presenting the business descriptions of the parent company OXIS International, Inc., followed by that of our 51% owned subsidiary, BioCheck, Inc., in separate sections for greater clarity.

OXIS INTERNATIONAL, INC.

OXIS International, Inc. focuses on the research and development of technologies and therapeutic products in the field of oxidative stress/inflammatory reaction, diseases that are associated with damage from free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Biological free radicals are the result of naturally occurring processes such as oxygen metabolism and inflammatory reactions. Free radicals react with key organic substances such as lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidation of these biomolecules can damage them, disturbing normal functions and may contribute to a variety of disease states. Organ systems that are predisposed to oxidative stress and damage are the pulmonary system, the brain, the eye, circulatory system, and reproductive systems. A prime objective of OXIS is to use its broad portfolio of oxidative stress biomarkers to identify associations between reactive biomarker signals and various disease etiologies and conditions

We presently derive our revenues primarily from sales of research diagnostic reagents and assays to medical research laboratories. Our diagnostic products include approximately 25 research reagents and assays to measure markers of oxidative stress.   We hold the rights to four therapeutic classes of compounds in the area of oxidative stress and inflammation. One such compound is L-Ergothioneine, a potent antioxidant produced by OXIS, that may be appropriate for sale over-the-counter as a dietary supplement. In September 2005 we acquired a 51% interest in and have the option to purchase the remaining 49% of BioCheck, Inc.


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Oxidative stress and/or inflammation are associated with an excess of free radicals/reactive oxygen species and a decrease in antioxidant levels resulting in the development of tissue or organ damage OXIS has invested significant resources to build a substantial patent position on our portfolio of antioxidant therapeutic technologies and selected oxidative stress/inflammatory reaction assays.

Marketed Products

We have developed, commercialized and marketed an extensive product line that provides several types of tools for researchers to identify and measure the balance between oxidative, nitrosative, antioxidant and inflammatory biomarkers in biological samples. We offer more than 60 research products for sale, including 25 research diagnostic assay test kits for markers of oxidative and nitrosative stress. We also market antibodies, enzymes and controls for use primarily in research laboratories. The antibodies provide detection of oxidative, nitrosative, antioxidant and inflammatory markers in some cases different from those measured by our assay test kits. The enzymes have been shown in early in vitro studies and preclinical animal studies to allow manipulation and control of oxidative biomarkers of protein and DNA, nitric oxide, antioxidant enzymes and inflammatory neutrophils. Our assays are useful, as shown in controlled in vitro studies and in vivo preclinical studies, in monitoring oxidative biomarkers of lipids, proteins and DNA, and nitrosative and antioxidant biomarkers. In addition, we have marketed the antioxidant Ergothioneine to selected customers, including prominent industry leaders in the cosmetics industry.

OXIS Research Diagnostic Assays

Our primary research diagnostic assay product line is comprised of approximately 25 assay test kits which measure key markers in free radical biochemistry for oxidative and nitrosative stress. Specifically, these assays measure levels of general and specific antioxidant activity, oxidative alterations to lipid, protein and DNA substrates, and pro-oxidant activation of specific white blood cells. Fifteen of our research assays were manufactured at our facility in Portland, Oregon and with the closing of the Portland facility, the manufacturing of our research assays was transferred to BioCheck’s Foster City facility during the first quarter of 2006. As of the date of this Report, we along with BioCheck are manufacturing research assays under a mutual services agreement between BioCheck and us. If BioCheck ceased participating in the manufacture of our research assays before we engaged an alternative manufacturer, our business would be adversely affected. Ten other research assays are manufactured by third party suppliers pursuant to private label arrangements or in-house development and manufacture.
 
Our research diagnostic assay test kits utilize either chemical (colorimetric) or immunoenzymatic (EIA) reactions that can be read using laboratory spectrophotometers and/or microplate readers, respectively. We believe our assays offer advantages over other laboratory methods, including ease of use, speed, specificity, accuracy and proprietary technology. Our research diagnostic assays for markers of oxidative stress are generally protected by trade secrets, and to some extent, patents. Five U.S. patents and eight international patents have been issued with respect to these assays. The oxidative stress assays are sold under the registered trademark “Bioxytech.” We continue to offer a few proprietary antioxidants and specialty chemicals but our product development focus and support are directed at assays, antibodies and enzymes in the area of oxidative and nitrosative stress.  


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Ergothioneine

L-Ergothioneine (ERGO) is a naturally occurring, water soluble, antioxidant amino acid molecule found in most animals and plants. It is considered one of the most potent biological antioxidants known. ERGO neutralizes hydroxyl free radicals and hypochlorous acid, which are common products of immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. This nutrient increases respiration and oxidation of fat, protects the mitochondria from damage due to environmental ultraviolet radiation and aids in the detoxification of the liver. We have developed the only published and patented method for producing commercial quantities of enantiomerically pure ERGO, which is analytically indistinguishable from the biological material. We hold the patents and patent applications for the protective effect of ERGO on mitochondria, the commercial preparation process and the neuroprotective effects of ERGO.

OXIS has sold ERGO to selected customers as a potentially anti-aging component in skin care products sold by the cosmetics industry. Sales of ERGO were temporarily halted pending development of a large scale-up manufacturing process as well as new chiral analytic procedures. Sales of ERGO were $1,000 in 2006 and $18,000 in 2005. Sales during 2006 were made to three customers in research quantities. Sales during 2005 were to one customer in the cosmetics industry in connection with such customer’s marketing campaign of a formulation of cosmetics which included, among other components, ERGO. We have not received any indication that additional orders are expected. We can give no assurances that sales of ERGO to this customer or other cosmetics industry customers will resume.

Marketing

We market products and technologies related to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs as a result of an imbalance between damaging free-radicals and related molecules and their inactivation by antioxidants. Oxidative stress can cause tissue injury by triggering cell death or inciting a tissue-damaging inflammatory response.
 
During 2006, we continued to market our research diagnostic assay products to professional scientists in academia, industry and government through our OXIS Research catalog. Our marketing program is centered on targeting medical, environmental and various industry audiences interested in oxidative and nitrosative stress. Nitrosative stress occurs when the generation of reactive nitrogen species in a system exceeds the system’s ability to neutralize and eliminate them. Primary vehicles for this marketing program include printed literature, the OXIS Research website and attendance at conferences targeting neuroscience, cancer, cardiac and nutritional researchers.

Our assays for markers of oxidative stress are currently being sold both directly by us and through a network of distributors to researchers primarily in the United States, Europe and the Pacific Rim. We estimate that there are more than 10,000 scientists and clinicians who are working directly in research on free radical biochemistry, and who are potential customers for these research diagnostic assays. We continue to seek to strengthen our international distribution network by adding new distributors around the world. These distributors are primarily focused on sales of research products in the life science market. In 2006, 43 distributors accounted for approximately 44% of our total revenues. Although we have not recruited distributors for Ergothioneine, we intend to establish and implement a plan to do so in the future.

During 2006, approximately 9% of our total revenues were from Funakoshi, a distributor customer located in Japan. We expect revenues from sales to Funakoshi for fiscal year 2007 to be similar to those in 2006.


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Foreign Operations and Export Sales

Revenues attributed to countries outside the United States based on the location of customers were:

 
 
2006
 
2005
 
 Japan    $ 151,000     $ 163,000   
Korea
   
55,000
   
76,000
 
Poland
   
53,000
   
54,000
 
France
   
45,000
   
94,000
 
Canada
   
35,000
   
47,000
 
Other foreign countries
   
296,000
   
275,000
 

Revenues to other foreign countries included sales in more than 40 countries. International revenue accounted for 42% of our 2006 revenues.

Other OXIS Therapeutic Compounds

    Our therapeutic and nutraceutical product portfolio includes four classes of antioxidant molecules: glutathione peroxidase mimics including BXT-51072, Ergothioneine analogs, lipid soluble antioxidants and superoxide dismutase (Palosein/Orgotein).

BXT (Organoselenium) Compounds

    Our lead therapeutic antioxidant drug candidate, BXT-51072, completed a Phase IIA clinical trial in inflammatory bowel disease in 1999, but due to the lack of financial resources, we ceased further testing of BXT-51072. In September 2004, we entered into an Exclusive Licensing Agreement relating to BXT-51072 and related compounds with HaptoGuard, Inc., which has since been merged into Alteon Inc. Under the agreement, we granted HaptoGuard exclusive worldwide rights, in certain defined areas of cardiovascular indications, to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds from our library of such antioxidant compounds.
    
    On April 2, 2007, we entered into an Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement with Alteon, Inc. (“Alteon”), under which we have granted Alteon worldwide exclusive rights to a family of orally bioavailable organoselenium compounds that have demonstrated potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in clinical and preclinical studies. The amended and restated exclusive license agreement supercedes and replaces our prior agreement with HaptoGuard. The new agreement expands the scope of the original agreement to also include non-cardiovascular indications. 
 
    Under the new agreement, Alteon agreed to invest a minimum of $7.5 million over a three year period following the effective date of the agreement, in its development program for the development, discovery and manufacture of licensed products based on the processes and compounds covered under the license. Alteon agreed to pay us a non-refundable sum of $500,000, payable in six monthly installments of $50,000, with the remaining $200,000 payable upon the closing of a financing of Alteon approved by Alteon’s shareholders. The agreement also provides for milestone payments to us upon certain significant milestone events in the development of a potential drug product. The agreement also entitles us to various levels of sublicensing fees and royalties based on a percentage of net sales of the licensed product. For additional details regarding this license agreement, see the section entitled “License Agreement with Alteon” on page 28 of this report.


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Ergothioneine as a Veterinary Product
 
On March 21, 2007, we signed a supply agreement for ERGO with Golden Gourmet Mushrooms (GGM) of San Marcos, CA, a leading marketer to the equine industry of natural organic dietary supplements. OXIS will allow GGM to market the product under our owned trademark, ERGOLDTM. GGM currently markets Mushroom Matrix (M2™) to the United States equine market and small animal pet market as a natural organic dietary supplement. GGM’s marketing plan is to add ERGO (ERGOLDTM) to the M2™ product to confer viral shield capacity and sell the product through veterinary practices. The research data underscoring this nutritional approach was shown in a recently published paper entitled “Activity of the Dietary Antioxidant Ergothioneine in a Virus Gene-Based Assay for Inhibitors of HIV Transcription.” Potential future markets include making this product available to domestic animals such as dogs and cats.

Ergothioneine as a Nutraceutical Supplement

We believe that our Ergothioneine compound may be well suited for development as a nutraceutical supplement that can be sold over the counter in the human and veterinary markets and we intend to pursue the development of Ergothioneine for use in such markets. We have outsourced the manufacturing of the raw material and we are working to expand this manufacturing capacity. We are currently testing Ergothioneine produced in bulk to ensure that its purity level is acceptable.

Lipid Soluble Antioxidants Patented Compound Group

Our LSA molecules are designed to mimic the activity of the body’s natural cell membrane-protecting antioxidant, vitamin E. Molecules from this series are 20 to 40 fold more potent than vitamin E and move into cell membranes much more quickly, making them more appropriate as drugs than the natural vitamin. The primary disease targets for this series of molecules will include neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease as well as cardiovascular diseases.

Superoxide Dismutase (SOD)

SOD is a naturally occurring genzyme found in essentially all living organisms. SOD catalyzes the destruction of the “Superoxide” molecule. OXIS SOD has been marketed in Europe by Tedec-Meiji under the brand name Orgotein. This product has been used in Spain for many years in the treatment of Chronic Inflammatory Joint Diseases and in the prevention of Radiation Fibrosis and scarring in patients with Colerectal Carcinoma undergoing radiation treatment.  Palosein (superoxide dismutase) is our proprietary free radical scavenger, which has demonstrated clinical efficacy as a potent anti-inflammatory drug for tendon and ligament injuries, arthritis and disc disease in dogs and horses. The product had been marketed under the brand name Palosein for veterinary use in the United States. The FDA has notified us that an updated release formulation protocol must be submitted to the agency for approval prior to any further marketing in the U.S. of this product. We are currently evaluating various paths to facilitate reintroduction of Palosein/Orgotein to the marketplace.

We intend to focus on and intensify our efforts to form diagnostic, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical relationships and strategic partnerships with larger companies for the purpose of further developing and exploiting our antioxidant molecules. No assurance can be given that our efforts will generate the results anticipated by our management or will in the future be favorable to us.



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Myeloperoxidase Assay/Cardiovascular Predictor Product

Given sufficient capital resources, we intend to pursue further development of our myeloperoxidase assay, or MPO, a research assay, which could be utilized either alone or in combination with other assays in the clinical predictive/ diagnostic market. Currently, biomarkers used for prediction of heart attacks (myocardial infarction) present significant limitations in predictive quality due to variability of patient population, the range for abnormal test results and other factors including assay sensitivity and ease of use. In contrast, blood plasma MPO levels, as measured by our MPO kit using our proprietary monoclonal antibody, appear to be a better predictor of patients at risk for cardiac events before they occur, according to a report in the October 23, 2003 New England Journal of Medicine. Our MPO assay kit was used in that study to evaluate myeloperoxidase levels in 604 hospital emergency room patients with chest pain. A single measurement of plasma myeloperoxidase using our MPO assay kit was able to identify patients at risk for a future heart attack, even when no tissue damage to the heart was evident. Furthermore, the test was better than some established biomarkers at predicting the risk of a major cardiac event following the initial visit to the emergency room.

We have undertaken collaborative research with selected research scientists on the development of a cardiovascular predictor product using our MPO assay combined with other assays currently in-house or under development.   We are reassessing this development program in the context of our new research and development association with BioCheck.

Out-Licensed Technology

Our lead therapeutic drug candidate, BXT-51072 (BXT), is a low molecular weight oral drug that mimics the antioxidant enzyme known as glutathione peroxidase. BXT directly neutralizes hydrogen peroxide and appears to protect cells from peroxide mediated damage. It also inhibits nucleic transcription and prevents the activation of cytokines, adhesion molecules and inflammatory enzymes, which are all mediators of inflammation. We completed a Phase IIA clinical trial in inflammatory bowel disease with BXT-51072 in 1999. This Phase IIA trial was a multi-center, nonrandomized, open-label, two-arm study which assessed the safety, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy of BXT-51072; clinical results showed potential promise as a therapeutic agent in GI disease. Due to the lack of financial resources, we ceased further testing of BXT-51072 at that time until further funding could be obtained.

In September 2004, we entered into an Exclusive License and Supply Agreement relating to BXT-51072 and related compounds with HaptoGuard, Inc., a New York based biopharmaceutical company which has since been merged into Alteon Inc. Under the agreement, we granted Alteon exclusive worldwide rights, in certain defined areas of cardiovascular indications, to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds from our library of such antioxidant compounds. Under the license agreement, Alteon (as successor of Haptoguard) is responsible for worldwide product development programs with respect to the licensed compounds. We received an upfront license fee of $450,000, and Alteon is obligated to pay royalties on net sales of certain licensed products, and additional fees in excess of US $21 million for the achievement of development milestones as well as regulatory approvals. There can be no assurances that royalty payments will result or that milestone payments will be realized.

On July 20, 2006, we entered into an amendment to the exclusive license and supply agreement originally dated September 28, 2004 with HaptoGuard (now merged with Alteon). Under the agreement, as subsequently amended on March 22, 2005, July 20, 2006 and April 6, 2006, we granted Alteon three-month extensions to fulfill its obligation to begin Phase II clinical trials with a licensed product, upon payment of $50,000 for each extension. In addition, under those amendments we agreed to change the timeline for initiation of Phase IIb clinical trials with a licensed product under the license agreement and agreed to allow the same extension arrangement for that milestone. We received a $50,000 payment from Alteon on July 24, 2006 for the first extension ending on September 30, 2006.


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On April 2, 2007 we entered into an Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement with Alteon, Inc. pursuant to which we granted Alteon an exclusive, sole, worldwide license to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds covered by certain patent rights, with the right to sublicense. This license agreement amends and supersedes the Exclusive License and Supply Agreement previously entered into between OXIS and HaptoGuard, Inc. (now part of Alteon) on September 28, 2004, as amended. Alteon’s lead compound under the previous license, ALT-2074 (formerly BXT 51072) is currently in a Phase 2 clinical study for cardiovascular indications and is one of a family of licensed compounds that are orally bioavailable organoselenium compounds that have demonstrated potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in clinical and preclinical studies. Unlike the previous license agreement with HaptoGuard, in this Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement, the license is not limited in relation to particular clinical indications. Under the license agreement, Alteon is responsible for funding product development programs with respect to the licensed compounds. OXIS shall receive a non-refundable up-front license fee of $500,000 and Alteon is obligated to pay royalties on net sales of licensed products, with certain adjustments under certain conditions, as well as additional fees for the achievement of certain development and regulatory approval milestones. There can be no assurances that royalty payments will result or that milestone payments will be realized. In addition, within 14 days of the effective date of the license agreement, Alteon will purchase shares of common stock at a premium to the market price in the aggregate amount of $500,000. Alteon shall control, prosecute and maintain all licensed patents and shall be responsible for all costs and expenses in connection with the filing, prosecution and maintenance of the licensed patents.

We have the right to terminate the license agreement if Alteon fails to pay us any required payments under the license agreement and such failure is not cured after written notice. Alteon may terminate the agreement by providing us with 180 days’ written notice. Either party may terminate the agreement upon 30 days’ written notice upon certain events relating to the other party’s bankruptcy, insolvency, dissolution, winding up or assignment for the benefit of creditors, or upon the other party’s uncured breach of any material provision of the agreement. Otherwise, the license agreement terminates upon the expiration of the underlying patents relating to the licensed compounds, on a country by country basis.

BIOCHECK, INC.

Our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, is a leading producer of clinical diagnostic assays, including high quality enzyme immunoassay research services and immunoassay kits for cardiac and tumor markers, infectious diseases, thyroid function, steroids, and fertility hormones designed to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of in vitro (outside the body) diagnostic testing in clinical laboratories. BioCheck focuses primarily on the immunoassay segment of the clinical diagnostics market. BioCheck manufactures over 40 clinical diagnostic assays in its 15,000 square-foot, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, certified Good Manufacturing Practices device-manufacturing facility in Foster City, California.

On September 19, 2005, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with BioCheck and its stockholders to purchase all of its common stock for $6.0 million in cash. BioCheck is a leading producer of enzyme immunoassay diagnostic kits for clinical laboratories. On December 6, 2005, we purchased 51% of the shares of BioCheck’s common stock from each of its stockholders on a pro rata basis for $3,060,000 in cash. Pursuant to the stock purchase agreement, we will use our reasonable best efforts to consummate a follow-on financing transaction to raise additional capital with which to purchase the remaining outstanding shares of BioCheck in one or more additional closings.

John Chen, Ph.D., co-founded BioCheck in January 1997 and has since served as Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board. He is a biochemist and clinical chemist with 30 years of research and development and assay development expertise. Dr. Chen has developed over 50 enzyme immunoassay and rapid tests, a number of which have been approved for marketing by the FDA. His technical expertise in immunology and biochemistry is complemented by his ability to facilitate technology transfer from research and development to manufacturing.


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Dr. Chen co-founded Rapid Diagnostics, Inc. in 1998, specializing in the development of rapid diagnostic test kits for the drugs of abuse. The company was acquired by ICN Pharmaceuticals, Inc. in 2002.

Prior to co-founding BioCheck, Dr. Chen co-founded Medix Biotech, Inc. in 1983, specializing in monoclonal/polyclonal antibodies, enzyme immunoassay test kits, and rapid test kits. Following Medix Biotech’s acquisition by Genzyme Corporation in 1992, Dr. Chen remained as Vice President of Research and Development until 1995. Between 1981 and 1983, he co-founded Pacific Biotech Inc. that was subsequently acquired by Eli Lilly and Company in 1990. At Pacific Biotech, Dr. Chen was instrumental in the development of the first rapid pregnancy test. He also previously served research scientist roles at Sigma Chemical, Mallinckrodt, and Beckman Instruments. Dr. Chen holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Tunghai University in Taiwan and a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

Effective December 6, 2005 and in connection with our acquisition of a 51% majority stake in BioCheck, Dr. Chen entered into an executive employment agreement, under which Dr. Chen became employed as President of BioCheck. Dr. Chen has agreed to devote not less than 90% of his business time and efforts to the primary business of BioCheck. In the event that BioCheck terminates the employment of Dr. Chen at any time other than for cause, Dr. Chen will receive an amount equal to 12 months of his then-current base salary.

BioCheck Products and Services

BioCheck offers its clinical laboratory and in vitro diagnostics customers over 40 clinical diagnostic assays manufactured in its 15,000 square-foot, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, certified Good Manufacturing Practices device-manufacturing facility in Foster City, California. Of the 40 total clinical diagnostic assays offered by BioCheck, 17 clinical diagnostic assays have been cleared by the FDA for marketing and sales and a number of its products have FDA certificates to foreign governments and certificates of exportability. BioCheck’s clinical diagnostic kits have been registered in Brazil, China, India, Italy, Taiwan, Turkey, and the United Kingdom, and BioCheck’s distributors deliver its products to countries in Central and South America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia.

BioCheck Clinical Diagnostics

The clinical diagnostics market consists of companies that develop and manufacture a wide array of instruments, immunoassays reagents and data analysis tools. Diagnostic instruments are the key hardware components, such as automated immunoassay analyzers, used in the automatic processing of the diagnostic tests. Reagents are the bioactive test ingredients which, when combined with the biologically derived samples, provide the diagnostic test results. The analysis tools, such as software programs and applications, assist the researchers and clinicians in the interpretation of data collected from high-volume analyzers and reagents.

BioCheck focuses primarily on the immunoassay segment of the clinical diagnostics market. The simplified, basic components of any immunoassay system are: an antigen, an antibody specific to this antigen, and a system to measure the amount of the antigen in a given sample. The commonly used immunoassays share four common components required to produce a high quality immunoassay product: a supply of high-purity antigens, a supply of high quality, specific monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies, a stable detection system, and a precise method for separating the bound detection system at the end of the reaction. The ability to develop, isolate and maintain the antibodies is a critical component of immunoassay technology.



12


BioCheck’s primary product line consists of enzyme linked immunoassay, or ELISA, kits that are widely used in medical laboratory settings. An ELISA test consists of linking an antibody or antigen to an enzyme in order to detect a match between the antibody and antigen. An ELISA test is used to detect specific antigens in a biological sample and the presence of antibodies attached to specific antigenic sites on proteins or other molecules in a biological sample.

The primary antibody development platform of BioCheck utilizes hybridoma technology. This process creates monoclonal antibodies to precisely measure very low concentrations of proteins in blood and plasma. The ability to express, isolate and maintain high-quality antibodies is a critical component of immunoassay test kit technology. BioCheck uses standard chromatography technology and its proprietary antibody conjugation methods for its antibody purification services and antibody conjugates. We believe that BioCheck’s products and services exceed industry average standards for stability and purity.

Test kits manufactured by BioCheck identify the existence, and in some cases the amount, of a specific molecule, or marker, that is an indicator of a condition or disease state. These test kits are applicable to cardiac markers; tumor markers for liver, ovarian, breast, prostate and gastrointestinal conditions; infectious diseases including pregnancy-related panel screens for toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus, and the herpes virus; thyroid function; steroids including Estradiol, Progesterone, Testosterone, and Estriol; and fertility hormones.

BioCheck’s revenues from product shipments were $3.7 million in 2006, $3.5 million in 2005 and $3.9 million in 2004.

BioCheck Research Reagents and Assay Kits

BioCheck currently has several products under development for cancer, cardiac/inflammatory and angiogenesis research applications. A research assay and reagents for the detection of HMGA2, a marker for aggressive breast cancer have been marketed since July 2006. Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory protein that has utility as a prognostic marker for cardiac events. A new myeloperoxidase research assay has been developed that resulted in commercial sales in November 2006.   Id proteins play a central role in cell differentiation, and Id1 and Id3 play a central and critical role in tumor related angiogenesis. BioCheck has developed research assays and rabbit monoclonal antibodies for the detection of human and mouse Id proteins. These Id protein assays and reagents were available for commercial launch in the fourth quarter of 2006.
 

BioCheck Cardiovascular Markers

Coronary heart disease, or CHD, is the most common form of heart disease caused by a narrowing of the coronary arteries that feed the heart. It is the number one cause of mortality for both men and women in the U.S. Approximately seven million Americans suffer from CHD and more than 500,000 Americans die of heart attacks caused by CHD every year. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a multi-center epidemiologic study in 2003. Increased levels of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase, or Lp-PLA2, in patients followed in this study have been linked to increased risk of CHD. In collaboration with diaDexus, BioCheck has developed and manufactures an FDA cleared clinical diagnostic test for Lp-PLA2 called the PLAC test. While the PLAC test is not a stand-alone test for predicting CHD, it provides supportive evidence when used with clinical evaluation and other tools for patient risk assessment. An elevated PLAC level with an LDL-cholesterol level of less than 130 mg/dL suggests that patients have two to three times the risk of having coronary heart disease when compared with patients having lower PLAC test results. BioCheck manufactures the PLAC test and diaDexus promotes and sells it to the medical community. BioCheck’s revenues from PLAC test manufacturing and services were approximately $520,000 in 2006, $340,000 in 2005 and $580,000 in 2004, however, OXIS management does not expect that BioCheck’s sales to diaDexus will be a significant source of revenue in 2007.


13


BioCheck Research Services

In addition to clinical and research assay products, BioCheck provides various research services to pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies worldwide. Research services consist primarily of highly specialized laboratory testing that enhances the speed, and lowers the clinical risk, of the pharmaceutical development process. The services include custom immunoassay development, antibody purification and conjugation, and immunoassay assembly.

·  
Custom Immunoassay Development. With over 30 years of experience and the development over 40 immunoassay products, BioCheck’s in-house research and development team provides antibodies and antigens, and assists biotechnology and pharmaceutical customers with the development of their immunoassay test kits.

·  
Antibody Purification and Conjugation. Using chromatography technology and proprietary antibody conjugation methods, BioCheck offers antibody purification services and antibody conjugates. Stability testing has indicated that BioCheck’s conjugates remain active for five years.

·  
Immunoassay Assembly Services. Having developed over 40 immunoassay products, BioCheck has exceptional test kit packaging experience and can provide custom immunoassay assembly services for our customers.

Further Information Regarding OXIS and BioCheck

Research and Development

BioCheck invested $518,000, $432,000 and $726,000 in research and development in the years 2006, 2005 and 2004, respectively. As of December 31, 2006, BioCheck employed five employees in research and development. During 2006, BioCheck’s research staff was primarily used to produce compounds for diagnostic use and optimize methods for binding these compounds to biological reagents such as antibodies. BioCheck employs a proprietary process for antibody conjugation resulting in highly stable products. BioCheck also developed proprietary clinical diagnostics tests that include promising new angiogenesis tumor markers and an aggressive breast cancer marker, which were launched in the fourth quarter of 2006.

Angiogenesis Tumor Markers

 In April 2004, BioCheck entered into a development and marketing agreement with AngioGenex for the diagnostic/prognostic applications of Id proteins in angiogenesis, which is the formation of blood vessels. The therapeutic and diagnostic applications of this process were patented by Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Albert Einstein Medical College and licensed to AngioGenex. The diagnostic application was subsequently licensed to BioCheck.
 
Id genes are expressed at high levels to produce Id proteins in many tissues during human embryonic development, but are generally not expressed, or expressed at very low levels, in adults except in some tumor cell types and tumor blood vessels. Id1, Id2 and Id3 proteins have been closely implicated in tumor-associated angiogenesis. Interfering with the action of the Id proteins may prove to be very effective in preventing the growth and metastases of both early and established tumors. The effectiveness of this approach has been demonstrated in commercially available therapeutic drugs, such as Avastin™, which targets the vascular endothelial growth factor. Such therapeutics have been modestly effective, suggesting the need for research and development to identify more powerful and specific agents for cancer therapy.


14


BioCheck’s goal is to clinically validate an Id-based diagnostic/prognostic product in collaboration with AngioGenex. During 2006, BioCheck’s research staff continued to work on the clinical validation of potential diagnostic products based on Id proteins related to tumor angiogenesis. Monoclonal antibodies to the Id proteins are required in order to develop highly sensitive ELISA diagnostic and prognostic tests. BioCheck has developed rabbit monoclonal anti-Id1, Id2 and Id3 antibodies that can be used in cell and tissue extracts through commonly utilized detection methods including Western Blot analysis, immunohistochemistry staining and ELISA tests. Western Blot analysis is a method of separating proteins by mass through a gel based process. Immunohistochemistry staining is a process of localizing proteins in cells by tagging their respective antibodies with color producing tags. ELISA tests are used for measuring the amount of Id1, Id2 and Id3 proteins in cell culture supernatants, and cell and tissue extracts.

Aggressive Breast Cancer Marker

In 2005, BioCheck entered into a development and marketing agreement with HMGene, Inc., or HMGene, based in Piscataway, New Jersey for the development and manufacturing of an ELISA test for the HMGA2 gene. The HMGA2 gene has been implicated in aggressive forms of breast cancer. The detection technology for tissue staining and peripheral blood samples related to the HMGA2 gene has been patented by HMGene and licensed to BioCheck for the development of rabbit polyclonal and monoclonal anti-HMGA2 antibodies. These antibodies can be used for Western Blot analyses, immunohistochemistry staining and ELISA assays.

While we believe that these are potentially promising diagnostic products, no assurances can be given that the company will have sufficient funding and resources to continue research, development and commercialization of these technologies.
 
Patents and Trademarks

OXIS Patent Portfolio
 
We are substantially dependent on our ability to obtain and maintain patents and proprietary rights for our marketed products and to avoid infringing the proprietary rights of others. We have an extensive portfolio of patents for diagnostic assays and several series of small molecular weight molecules to detect, treat and monitor diseases associated with damage from free radicals and reactive oxygen species. This portfolio provides opportunities to apply our technologies to a wide range of diseases and conditions of oxidative stress.

We currently hold a total of 90 patents, 29 of which have been granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and 61 of which have been granted by foreign regulatory agencies. We also have 26 patent applications pending, including 8 filed in the U.S. and 18 file internationally.

Patent coverage includes aspects of all four of our classes of small molecular weight antioxidant molecules. We hold the patents and patent applications for the protective effect of Ergothioneine on mitochondria, the commercial preparation process and the neuroprotectant methods and compositions of Ergothioneine.   We have sublicensed to HaptoGuard, Inc. three patents and one patent application related to BXT-51072. Our assays for markers of oxidative stress are generally protected by trade secrets, and to some extent, patents. Five U.S. patents and eight international patents have been issued with respect to these assays. The oxidative stress assays are sold under the registered trademark BioxytechÒ. Associated foreign patents have been issued in most cases and foreign patent applications have been filed associated with the listed patents and patent applications.

Below we have listed selected patents and patent applications relating to our core business including marketed products and sublicenses.



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OXIS Research Assay Patents

 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,726,063 issued March 10, 1998 for “Method of Colorimetric Analysis of Malonic Dialdehyde and 4-Hydroxy-2-Enaldehydes as Indexes of Lipid Peroxidation, Kits for Carrying Out Said Method, Substituted Indoles for Use in Said Method and their Preparation” will expire on May 6, 2014.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,543,298 issued August 6, 1996 for “Method for Assaying the SOD Activity by Using a Self-Oxidizable Compound Necessary for its Implementation, Self-Oxidizable Compounds and Preparation Thereof” will expire on August 6, 2013.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 6,235,495 issued May 1, 2001 for “Methods for the Quantiation of In Vivo Levels of Oxidized Glutathione” will expire on November 12, 2019.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,861,262 issued January 19, 1999 for “Method of the Specific Immunoassay of Human Plasma Glutathione Peroxidase, Kit for its Implementation, Oligopeptides and Antibodies Specific for the Method” will expire on January 19, 2016.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,817, 520 issued October 6, 1998 for “Spectrophotometric Methods for Assaying Total Mercaptans, Reduced Glutathione (GSH) and Mercaptans other than GSH in an Aqueous Medium, Reagents and Kits for Implementing Same” will expire on December 15, 2012.

OXIS Ergothioneine Patents

 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,438,151 issued August 1, 1995 entitled “Process for the Preparation of Ergothioneine” will expire on February 8, 2014.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 6,103,746 issued August 8, 2000 entitled “Methods and Compositions for the Protection of Mitochondria” will expire on February 19, 2018.
 
·
 
Patent Application Serial No. 60/367,845 filed March 26, 2002 entitled “Neuroprotectant Methods, Compositions and Screening Methods Thereof”.

Selected Licensed BXT-51072 Patents

 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,968,920 issued October 19, 1999 entitled “Novel Compounds having a Benzoisoelen-Azoline and -Azine Structure, Method for Preparing Same and Therapeutic Uses Thereof” will expire on April 7, 2015.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 6,093,532 issued July 25, 2000 entitled “Method for Storing a Biological Organ Transplant Graft Using a Benzisoelen-Azoline or -Azine Compound” will expire on April 7, 2015.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 5,973,009 issued October 26, 1999 entitled “Aromatic Diselenides and Selenosulfides, their Preparation and their Uses, more Particularly their Therapeutic Use” will expire on December 23, 2017.
 
·
 
U.S. Patent 6,525,040 issued February 25, 2003 entitled “Cyclic Organoselenium Compounds, their Preparation and their Uses” will expire on December 23, 2017.

These patents can expire earlier if they are abandoned or are not adequately maintained. We cannot assure you that corresponding patents will be issued or that the scope of the coverage claimed in our patent applications will not be significantly reduced prior to any patent being issued.
 
BioCheck Patent Applications and Other Rights

As of December 31, 2006, BioCheck had filed two patent applications covering research and diagnostic assays to detect Id1 and Id2 related to tumor angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels in tumors.
 
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In April 2004, AngioGenex, Inc. (“AngioGenex”), based in New York City, and BioCheck entered into an agreement to develop cancer diagnostic and prognostic products based on the Id-gene platform technology licensed exclusively to AngioGenex by the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. The agreement assigns to BioCheck exclusive rights to develop and market diagnostics based on AngioGenex’s Id technology in return for royalties.

A critical component of the clinical validation of an Id protein-based diagnostic/prognostic product is the development of monoclonal antibodies, or mAbs, to the Id proteins. Id proteins play a significant role in the process of tumor related angiogenesis and other functions related to blood vessel formation. BioCheck has developed rabbit monoclonal anti-Id1, Id2 and Id3 antibodies for Western Blot analyses and immunohistochemistry staining, and ELISA tests for measuring Id1, Id2 and Id3 in cell culture supernatants, and cell and tissue extracts.

AngioGenex and BioCheck have filed joint patent applications for the mAbs to the Id proteins. Under the joint patent application, BioCheck has the exclusive rights to the diagnostic applications of the Id proteins while AngioGenex owns the rights for the therapeutic drug applications. U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/691,060 was filed on June 16, 2005 related to the Id1 protein, titled “Novel Rabbit Monoclonal Antibodies to Id1”. The patent application related to the Id3 protein, titled “Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Id3 Protein” was filed on January 27, 2006.

BioCheck has filed a patent application for a clinical diagnostic related to the troponin protein complex. Certain types of troponin including cardiac troponin I and T are highly sensitive and specific indicators of damage to the heart muscle. Myocardial infarction, or a heart attack, can be differentiated from unstable angina, or pain, by measuring troponin in the blood in patients with chest pain. Patent application serial number 11/116,290 was filed April 28, 2005 titled “Immunoassay for Cardiac Troponin-I in Non-Human Mammalian Species.” John Chen is a co-inventor of the immunoassay that is the subject of this patent application.

Competition

According to Boston Biomedical Consultants and Morgan Stanley Research estimates, the worldwide clinical diagnostics market including instruments, immunoassays, rapid diagnostic tests and data analysis tools was approximately $22 billion in sales revenue in 2004 and increased approximately 9% from the previous year Competition in the clinical diagnostics market is intense and highly fragmented, with the largest competitor, Roche Diagnostics, holding a 16% market share.

BioCheck’s direct competitors are developers and manufacturers of research and clinical diagnostic products and include, but are not limited to, Adaltis Inc., BioSource International, Inc., Diagnostic Products Corporation, Monobind, Inc. and BioClone Australia Pty Ltd.

In order to continue to successfully market BioCheck’s products and services, the company will be required to demonstrate that its immunoassay products meet or exceed the industry standards for quality as measured by high levels of purity, stability, precision of measurement and cost effectiveness. The company’s competitors may succeed in developing or marketing products that are more effective or commercially attractive. The launch of these competitive products may adversely impact the market pricing for BioCheck’s products as some of these competitors have substantially greater financial, technical, research and development resources and more established marketing, sales, distribution and service organizations.

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Government Regulation
 
In the United States, our current products and manufacturing practices are not subject to regulation by the United States Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, pursuant to the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act as it relates to research products. Development, manufacture and marketing of clinical diagnostic products which we are currently pursuing and therapeutic compounds are regulated by the FDA. We believe that we currently are in compliance with all such regulations and intend that in the future all of our diagnostic and therapeutic developments will be in compliance with these regulations, as needed.

Employees

As of December 31, 2006, we had six full time employees, including one scientist in manufacturing/research and development, one employee in marketing and two employees in administrative and operational support. On December 6, 2005, we initiated a relocation plan to cease our operations in Portland, Oregon and relocate to Foster City, California at premises adjacent to those of BioCheck. We decided to relocate after reviewing and evaluating all aspects of our operations to determine the profitability and viability of continuing in the Portland, Oregon location. As part of the relocation that was effective February 15, 2006, we offered all regular full-time employees who were not relocated to Foster City, California severance benefits under an employee incentive package estimated to cost approximately $119,000. None of our employees are subject to a collective bargaining agreement. We believe our relationship with our employees is good, and we have never experienced an employee-related work stoppage.
 
As of December 31, 2006, BioCheck employed 24 full-time employees. Included among BioCheck’s full-time are 14 technicians in manufacturing, five scientists and research associates in research and development, two specialists in quality control functions, and professionals in administrative and operational support.

Facilities

We maintain a facility adjacent to BioCheck at 323 Vintage Park Drive, Suite B, Foster City, CA 94404, which also serves as our corporate headquarters. BioCheck occupies a 15,000 square foot facility adjacent to us, at Vintage Park, 323 Vintage Park Drive, Foster City, CA 94404. For further details regarding our facilities, please refer to Item 2 -- “Description of Property” below, which is incorporated by reference.
 
ITEM 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY

In December 6, 2005 we purchased 51% of BioCheck and initiated a transition plan to consolidate all operations at BioCheck’s manufacturing facility. Consequently, during 2006, we entered into a three-year lease agreement commencing on April 1, 2006 for 4,136 square feet of space immediately adjacent to BioCheck at 323 Vintage Park Drive, Suite B, Foster City, CA 94404. These premises serve to accommodate the relocation and consolidation of our corporate headquarters and operations.

BioCheck occupies approximately 15,000 square feet of administrative, laboratory and manufacturing space located at Vintage Park, 323 Vintage Park Drive, Foster City, CA 94404, pursuant to a lease expiring in December 2008. The facility has been certified according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, Good Manufacturing Practice standards, which are subject to annual audits by the FDA. In addition, the facility has been certified to meet the highest international manufacturing standard (ISO 13485) generally accepted in Europe and Asia, according to the International Organization for Standardization, or ISO. BioCheck believes that it is in compliance with all other regulatory certifications applicable to its line of business, including Device Manufacturing License for the state of California, Registration of Device Establishment, Certificate of Foreign Government and Certificate of Exportability.

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ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
A member of our board of directors, Steven T. Guillen, who was terminated from his position as our President and Chief Executive Officer on September 15, 2006, filed a lawsuit against us and up to 25 unnamed additional defendants. The complaint alleges breaches of contract relating to Mr. Guillen’s employment agreement and a promissory note that is in default, breach of implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, wrongful termination and violation of the California Labor Code in relation to the non-payment of back pay. On March 10, 2006, we received $200,000 in exchange for an unsecured promissory note with Mr. Guillen. Interest and principal were due on September 10, 2006 and at September 30, 2006 were in default. On November 2, 2006, we repaid Mr. Guillen the principal and accrued interest due on the promissory note in the amount of $209,000 and back pay with penalties and accrued interest of $96,000.

Settlement Agreement with Steve Guillen. In March 2007, we and Mr. Guillen executed and delivered a Confidential Separation Agreement (dated February 12, 2007), under which we agreed to pay Mr. Guillen the sum of $250,000 in twelve equal monthly installments, subject to standard payroll deductions and withholdings. We also agreed that Mr. Guillen’s stock options would immediately vest, and that to the extent the shares underlying such options are not registered, Mr. Guillen would be granted piggyback registration rights to cover these shares. Mr. Guillen would have the right to exercise his options until September of 2009. We also agreed to pay Mr. Guillen’s health insurance premiums for the twelve-month separation period in accordance with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985. In exchange for these payments and benefits, Mr. Guillen and OXIS agreed to mutually release all claims, dismiss all complaints as applicable, and neither party shall pursue any future claims regarding Mr. Guillen’s prior employment and compensation arrangements with us. A copy of the separation agreement is included as Exhibit 10.43 filed with this annual report on Form 10-K.

No other director, officer or affiliate of ours, and no owner of record or beneficial owner of more than five percent (5%) of the securities of the Company, or any associate of any such director, officer or security holder is a party adverse to us or any of our subsidiaries or has a material interest adverse to us or any of our subsidiaries in reference to pending litigation.

ITEM 4.  SUBMISSION OF MATTERS TO A VOTE OF SECURITY HOLDERS

No matter was submitted during the fourth quarter of 2006 to a vote of security holders, through solicitation or proxies or otherwise.

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PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR COMMON EQUITY AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

Our common stock continues to be traded in the Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board and remains listed in France on the Nouveau Marché and in Germany on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange.

The market represented by the OTCBB is limited and the price for our common stock quoted on the OTCBB is not necessarily a reliable indication of the value of our common stock. The following table sets forth the high and low bid prices for shares of our common stock for the periods noted, as reported on the OTCBB. Quotations reflect inter-dealer prices, without retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not represent actual transactions.

YEAR
 
PERIOD
 
HIGH
 
LOW
 
Fiscal Year 2004
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
0.90
 
$
0.52
 
 
 
 
Second Quarter  
 
$
0.84
 
$
0.45
 
 
 
 
Third Quarter  
 
$
0.69
 
$
0.32
 
 
 
 
Fourth Quarter  
 
$
0.65
 
$
0.41
 
Fiscal Year 2005
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
0.57
 
$
0.28
 
 
 
 
Second Quarter  
 
$
0.43
 
$
0.27
 
 
 
 
Third Quarter  
 
$
0.48
 
$
0.28
 
 
 
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.39
 
$
0.24
 
Fiscal Year 2006
 
 
First Quarter
 
$
0.38
 
$
0.26
 
 
 
 
Second Quarter
 
$
0.44
 
$
0.32
 
 
 
 
Third Quarter
 
$
0.36
 
$
0.21
 
 
 
 
Fourth Quarter
 
$
0.28
 
$
0.18
 
 
Stockholders
 
As of December 31, 2006, we had approximately 43,610,773 shares of common stock issued and outstanding which were held by approximately 2,834 stockholders of record, which total does not include stockholders who hold their shares in street name. The transfer agent for our common stock is ComputerShare, whose address is 250 Royall Street, Canton, Massachusetts 02021.
 
DIVIDEND POLICY
 
Our board of directors determines any payment of dividends. We utilize our assets to develop our business and, consequently, we have never paid a dividend and does not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future. Any future decision with respect to dividends will depend on future earnings, operations, capital requirements and availability, restrictions in future financing agreements and other business and financial considerations.


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Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

January 2004 Bridge Financing. On January 14, 2004, we completed a private placement of securities pursuant to which (i) certain investors paid us $570,000 in the aggregate, (ii) we issued promissory notes to the investors in principal amount of $570,000 in the aggregate, which promissory notes are convertible in due course into up to 1,425,000 shares of our common stock or into up to 3,800,000 shares of common stock in the event of a default by OXIS and if notified of such by the note holders (to which no notice was received) and (iii) we issued warrants to the investors exercisable for up to 1,250,000 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.50 per share. We received notice on December 30, 2004, that all investors had signed irrevocable letters of intent to convert their promissory notes and accrued interest into common stock. As a result, we issued 1,520,932 shares of common stock to the note holders. In connection with the note holders converting their notes to common stock, we issued 760,469 new warrants having a $1.00 exercise price and a five-year life. The private placement was exempt from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

December 2004 Common Stock and Warrant Financing. On December 30, 2004, we entered into definitive agreements with investors relating to the private placement of $6.5 million of our securities through the sale of 12,264,158 shares of our common stock at $0.53 per share. On January 6, 2005, we closed the private placement transaction with the investors. The transaction resulted in the issuance on or about January 10, 2005 of 12,264,158 shares of our common stock for which we received gross proceeds of $0.53 per share. In addition, on January 6, 2005, we issued to the purchasers in the private placement transaction warrants to purchase an additional 12,264,158 shares of our common stock, 50% at an exercise price of $0.66 per share and 50% at an exercise price of $1.00 per share. Upon the closing of the private placement transaction, as partial consideration for services rendered as the placement agent for the private placement transaction, we issued to Rodman & Renshaw, LLC a warrant to purchase 306,604 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.66 per share and a warrant to purchase 306,604 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $1.00 per share. The offer, sale and issuance of securities to the purchasers in the private placement were exempt from registration under the Securities Act, pursuant to Section 4(2) thereof, and Rule 506 promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act. The 12,264,158 shares of common stock issuable on December 30, 2004 and the 12,264,158 shares of common stock to be issued upon exercise of warrants were registered under a Form SB-2 registration statement that was declared effective on May 27, 2005.

April 2005 Note Conversion. During April 2005, 459,355 shares of common stock were issued in exchange for cancellation of a note payable for $160,000 and accrued interest of $84,000. The private placement was exempt from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

Series B Preferred Stock Financing. During the third quarter of 2005, 428,389 outstanding shares of Series B preferred stock were converted into 85,678 shares of common stock. The Series B preferred stock had certain preferential rights with respect to liquidation and dividends. Holders of Series B preferred stock were entitled to noncumulative annual dividends at the rate of $0.115 per share if and when declared by our board of directors. No dividends to Series B preferred stockholders were issued or unpaid during 2005. The private placement was exempt from registration under Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933.

October 2006 Convertible Debenture and Warrant Financing. On October 25, 2006, we entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement, or Purchase Agreement, with four accredited investors, or the Purchasers. In conjunction with the signing of the Purchase Agreement, we issued Secured Convertible Debentures, or Debentures, and Series A, B, C, D, and E Common Stock Warrants, or Warrants, to the Purchasers, and the parties also entered into a registration rights agreement and a Security Agreement, or collectively, the Transaction Documents.
 
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Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreement, we issued the Debentures in an aggregate principal amount of $1,694,250 to the Purchasers. The Debentures are subject to an original issue discount of 20.318% resulting in proceeds to OXIS of $1,350,000 from the transaction. The Debentures mature on October 25, 2008, but may be prepaid by us at any time provided that the common stock issuable upon conversion and exercise of the Warrants is covered by an effective registration statement. The Debentures are convertible, at the option of the Purchasers, at any time, into shares of common stock at $0.35 per share, as adjusted pursuant to a full ratchet anti-dilution provision, or the Conversion Price. Beginning on February 1, 2007, we began to amortize the Debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date, or the Monthly Redemption Amounts. The Monthly Redemption Amounts can be paid in cash or in shares, subject to certain restrictions. If we choose to make any Monthly Redemption Amount payment in shares of common stock, the price per share is the lesser of the Conversion Price then in effect and 85% of the weighted average price for the 10 trading days prior to the due date of the Monthly Redemption Amount.
 
Pursuant to the Debentures, we covenanted that we will not incur additional indebtedness for borrowed money, other than our current Bridge Bank Promissory Note which was owing at the time the Debenture financing was completed. The Bridge Bank Promissory Note was paid in full in February 2007. We also covenant that we will not pledge, grant or convey any new liens on its assets. The obligation to pay all unpaid principal will be accelerated upon an event of default, including upon failure to perform its obligations under the Debenture covenants, failure to make required payments, default on any of the Transaction Documents or any other material agreement, lease, document or instrument to which we are obligated, the bankruptcy of OXIS or related events. The Purchasers have a right of first refusal to participate in up to 100% of any future financing undertaken by us until the later of the date that the Debentures are no longer outstanding and the one year anniversary of the effective date of the registration statement. We are restricted from issuing shares of common stock or instruments convertible into common stock for 90 days after the effective date of the registration statement with certain exceptions. We are also prohibited from completing any subsequent financing involving a variable rate transaction until such time as no Purchaser holds any of the Debentures. In addition, until such time as any Purchaser holds any of the securities issued in the Debenture transaction, if we issue or sell any common stock or instruments convertible into common stock which a Purchaser reasonably believes is on terms more favorable to such investors than the terms pursuant to the Transaction Documents, we are obligated to amend the terms of the Transaction Documents to such Purchaser the benefit of such better terms. We may prepay the entire outstanding principal amount of the Debentures, plus accrued interest and other amounts payable, at our option at any time without penalty, provided that a registration statement is available for the resale of shares underlying the Debentures and Warrants, as more fully described in the Debentures. The purpose of this Debenture transaction is to provide us with intermediate term financing as we seek longer term financing.
 
On October 25, 2006 in conjunction with the signing of the Purchase Agreement, we issued to the Purchasers five year Series A Warrants to purchase an aggregate of 2,420,357 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share, one year Series B Warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.385 per share, and two year Series C Warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,840,714 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. In addition, we issued to the Purchasers Series D and E Warrants which become exercisable on a pro-rata basis only upon the exercise of the Series C warrants. The six year Series D Warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock have an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. The six year Series E Warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock have an initial exercise price of $0.385 per share. The initial exercise prices for each warrant are adjustable pursuant to a full ratchet anti-dilution provision and upon the occurrence of a stock split or a related event.
 
Pursuant to the registration rights agreement, we filed a registration statement covering the public resale of the shares underlying the Series A, B, C, D and E Warrants and the Debentures within 45 days of the closing of the transaction and caused the registration to be declared effective within 120 days of the closing date, The registration statement was declared effective by the SEC on February 12, 2007.
 
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Pursuant to the Security Agreement, we agreed to grant the Purchasers a security interest in substantially all of our assets. We also agreed to pledge our respective ownership interests in our wholly-owned subsidiaries, OXIS Therapeutics, OXIS Isle of Man, and our partial subsidiary, BioCheck, Inc. Our subsidiaries, OXIS Therapeutics and OXIS Isle of Man, also provided a subsidiary guarantee to the Purchasers in connection with the transaction.
 
As of March 31, 2007 we were in technical default under the October 2006 debentures, because of non-payment of the monthly redemption payments which became due beginning on February 1, 2007. We are currently in negotiations with the debenture holders regarding the form of payment of these monthly redemption amounts, which may be in the form of shares of our common stock or cash.
 
Anti-dilution Adjustments Under Warrant to Fagan Capital. In connection with a loan, we issued a warrant to Fagan Capital on June 2, 2006, for the purchase of up to 1,158,857 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.35 per share. This warrant contained an anti-dilution clause, which if triggered, would cause the warrant to be adjusted to increase the number of shares of common stock purchasable, and would lower the exercise price of the warrant. Specifically, the anti-dilution provision provides that if the Company should issue common stock for a per share price below $0.35, excluding up to 2.3 million shares issued for any purpose, then the exercise price (initially $0.35 per share) would be adjusted downward to equal the per-share price net of selling expenses received by the Company for such common stock (including the issuance of warrants or options with an exercise price below $0.35 per share). The warrant further provides that each time that an adjustment is required to be made to the exercise price of the warrant, proportionate adjustments will also be made to the number of shares which may be purchased under the warrant, so that (i) the total proceeds payable to the Company upon exercise in full of the warrant immediately prior to such adjustment to the exercise price shall equal (ii) the total proceeds payable to the Company upon exercise in full of the warrant immediately after such adjustment to the exercise price. In November 2006, we issued options and warrants for the purchase of shares in excess of the 2.3 million limit, at an exercise price as low as $0.18, to various officers and consultants. As a result, the warrant issued to Fagan Capital was adjusted automatically pursuant to its terms, such that it became exercisable for up to a maximum of 2,253,333 shares of common stock, and an exercise price of $0.18 per share.
 
Anticipated Investment by Alteon. Under the license agreement dated April 2, 2007 between Alteon, Inc and us, Alteon agreed to make an equity investment in our common stock, at a per-share price equal to 125% of the ten-day average trading price following the effective date of the agreement and no less than $0.24 per share, resulting in net proceeds to us of $500,000.

ITEM 6.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OR PLAN OF OPERATION

The following discussion and analysis or plan of operation should be read in conjunction with the consolidated financial statements and related notes. This discussion contains forward-looking statements based upon our current expectations and involves risks and uncertainties. Our actual results and the timing of certain events could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of certain factors, including those set forth in “Risks Related to Our Business,” “Business” and elsewhere in this document. See the paragraphs following the heading “Forward-Looking Statements” for additional discussion.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis or Plan of Operation is based on our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States.


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Introduction

We incurred net losses of $4.9 million in 2006 and $3.1 million in 2005. BioCheck generated a net profit of $0.3 million in 2006 and $0.2 million in 2005. This amount of profit generated from BioCheck is not enough to offset our current losses. Our 2006 net loss includes an expense of $1.6 million for an expense related to the convertible debentures issued in October 2006. Our plan is to increase revenues to generate sufficient gross profit in excess of selling, general and administrative, and research and development expenses in order to achieve profitability. However, we can not assure you that we will accomplish this task and there are many factors that may prevent us from reaching our goal of profitability.

On a consolidated basis, we had cash and cash equivalents of $1,208,000 at December 31, 2006 of which $792,000 was held by BioCheck. The cash held by us of $416,000 at December 31, 2006 is not sufficient to sustain our operations through the first half of 2007 without additional financings. Since BioCheck has been and is expected to continue to be cash flow positive, management believes that BioCheck’s cash will be sufficient to sustain BioCheck’s operating activities for the next 12 months. We cannot access the cash held by our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, to pay for our parent level operating expenses. During March 2006, we received $200,000 from Steven T. Guillen, our President and Chief Executive Officer in exchange for a promissory note and we entered into a Promissory Note, or Note, with Fagan Capital, Inc., pursuant to which Fagan Capital loaned us $400,000. Both of these notes were repaid from the proceeds of our $1,350,000 convertible debenture offering in October 2006.
 
The current rate of cash usage at our parent level raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, absent any new sources of significant cash flows. In an effort to mitigate this near-term concern, we obtained debt financing in which we received proceeds of $1,350,000 in October 2006 and we are seeking additional equity financing to obtain sufficient funds to sustain operations and purchase the remaining 49% of BioCheck for approximately $3.0 million. From this debt financing, $635,000 was used to repay existing debt, accrued interest and related legal fees. We plan to increase revenues by introducing new research assays and reagents as well as by out-licensing compounds from our antioxidant library. However, we cannot provide assurance that we will successfully obtain equity financing, if any, sufficient to finance our goals or that we will increase product related revenues. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event that we cannot continue in existence.

Overview

OXIS International, Inc. focuses on the research and development of technologies and therapeutic products in the field of oxidative stress/inflammatory reaction, diseases that are associated with damage from free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Biological free radicals are the result of naturally occurring processes such as oxygen metabolism and inflammatory reactions. Free radicals react with key organic substances such as lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidation of these biomolecules can damage them, disturbing normal functions and may contribute to a variety of disease states. Organ systems that are predisposed to oxidative stress and damage are the pulmonary system, the brain, the eye, circulatory system, and reproductive systems. A prime objective of OXIS is to use its broad portfolio of oxidative stress biomarkers and look for an association between reactive biomarker signals and various disease etiologies and conditions

We presently derive our revenues primarily from sales of research diagnostic reagents and assays to medical research laboratories. Our diagnostic products include approximately 25 research reagents and assays to measure markers of oxidative stress.   We hold the rights to four therapeutic classes of compounds in the area of oxidative stress and inflammation. One such compound is L-Ergothioneine, a potent antioxidant produced by OXIS, that may be appropriate for sale over-the-counter as a dietary supplement. In September 2005 we acquired a 51% interest in and have the option to purchase the remaining 49% of BioCheck, Inc.


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Our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, Inc. is a leading producer of clinical diagnostic assays, including high quality enzyme immunoassay research services and immunoassay kits for cardiac and tumor markers, infectious diseases, thyroid function, steroids, and fertility hormones designed to improve the accuracy, efficiency, and cost-effectiveness of in vitro (outside the body) diagnostic testing in clinical laboratories. BioCheck focuses primarily on the immunoassay segment of the clinical diagnostics market. BioCheck offers over 40 clinical diagnostic assays manufactured in its 15,000 square-foot, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA, certified Good Manufacturing Practices device-manufacturing facility in Foster City, California.

Current significant financial and operating events and strategies are summarized as follows:

Relocation of Operations

On December 6, 2005, we initiated a relocation plan to cease our operations in Portland, Oregon and relocate to Foster City, California. We decided to relocate after reviewing and evaluating all aspects of our operations to determine the profitability and viability of continuing in the Portland, Oregon location. During February 2006, we signed a lease agreement for approximately 4,000 square feet of space located immediately adjacent to those of BioCheck and relocated our manufacturing operations to Foster City, California. On February 15, 2006, we ceased operations at the Portland, Oregon facility and most of the Portland, Oregon employees were terminated. In connection with the relocation, we accrued $119,000 during 2005 for employee severances offered to all regular full-time employees who were not relocated to Foster City, California.

Product Development

During 2006, we expanded our product portfolio of research assay kits for the research markets with the addition of eight new assay products.  Given the availability of sufficient capital resources, we plan to pursue research and development of additional oxidative stress cardiac markers.  We are planning to expand our cardiovascular and inflammatory products and assays through the combination of our MPO assay with other in-house assays and new assays in development.  We also believe that our Ergothioneine compound may be well suited for development as a nutraceutical supplement that can be sold over the counter.  We are currently testing Ergothioneine produced in bulk to ensure that its purity level is acceptable. Given the availability of sufficient capital resources and the successful scale-up to a bulk manufacturing process that ensures an acceptable level of purity, we intend to pursue the development of Ergothioneine for use in the over the counter market, however, there can be no assurance as to when or if we will launch Ergotheioneine on a commercial basis as a nutraceutical.  

BioCheck currently has several products under development for cancer, cardiac/inflammatory and angiogenesis research applications. Among these products, BioCheck has marketed the following ELISA kits to the research market in 2006:
 
·  
Reagents for the detection of HMGA2, a marker for aggressive breast cancer (in July 2006);
 
·  
Research assays for the detection of HMGA2;
 
·  
Myeloperoxidase, an inflammatory protein that has utility as a prognostic marker for cardiac events; and
 
·  
A new myeloperoxidase research assay.

In addition, BioCheck has developed research assays and rabbit monoclonal antibodies for the detection of human and mouse Id proteins. Id proteins play a central role in cell differentiation, and Id1 and Id3 play a central and critical role in tumor related angiogenesis.  BioCheck began making Id protein reagents commercially available in January 2007, and it expect that the Id protein assays will be ready for commercial launch during 2007.

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Loans and Warrants

On December 6, 2005, we entered into a non-revolving one-year loan agreement with KeyBank, N.A., or KeyBank, and received funds of $3,060,000 to purchase 51% of BioCheck’s common stock. As security for our repayment obligations, we granted a security interest to KeyBank in our $3,060,000 certificate of deposit at KeyBank. This loan was repaid during February 2006 and a new one-year loan agreement for $3,060,000 was entered into with Bridge Bank. As part of the loan arrangement with Bridge Bank, we granted a security interest in a $3,060,000 certificate of deposit moved from KeyBank to Bridge Bank. The loan bears interest at 3.0% and the certificate of deposit bears interest at 1.0%. This loan was paid in full in February 2007 primarily with the proceeds of non-renewal of the certificate of deposit.

On March 10, 2006, we received $200,000 in exchange for an unsecured promissory note with Steven T. Guillen, our president and chief executive officer at that time. The related party note bore interest at 7.0%. Interest and principal were due on September 10, 2006. Mr. Guillen’s employment was terminated on September 15, 2006. On November 2, 2006, the Company paid to Mr. Guillen amounts owing under the note.

On March 31, 2006, we issued a $400,000 unsecured promissory note to Fagan Capital, Inc., or Fagan Capital. Interest accrued at an annual rate of 8.0% and interest and principal were due on June 2, 2006. On July 26, 2006, Fagan Capital extended the maturity date of the promissory note to June 1, 2007 and we issued to Fagan Capital a warrant to purchase 1,158,857 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. On October 25, 2006, the Company prepaid the principal, accrued interest and legal fees due pursuant to the Renewal Note in the amount of $426,000 and the Company undertook to finalize a registration rights agreement covering the shares underlying the common stock purchase warrant within 7 days of the prepayment of the Renewal Note.

Debt Financing

On October 25, 2006, we entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement, or Purchase Agreement, with four accredited investors, or the Purchasers. In conjunction with the signing of the Purchase Agreement, we issued Secured Convertible debentures, or debentures, and Series A, B, C, D, and E common stock warrants, and we also provided the investors with registration rights under a registration rights agreement, and a security interest in our assets under a security agreement to secure the performance of our obligations under the debentures.
 
Pursuant to the terms of the Purchase Agreement, we issued the debentures in an aggregate principal amount of $1,694,250 to the Purchasers. The debentures were issued with an original issue discount of 20.318%, and resulted in proceeds to us of $1,350,000. The debentures are convertible, at the option of the holders, at any time into shares of common stock at $0.35 per share, as adjusted in accordance with a full ratchet anti-dilution provision (referred to in this prospectus as the “conversion price”). Beginning on the first of the month following the earlier of the effective date of the registration statement to be filed pursuant to the registration rights agreement and February 1, 2007, we will amortize the debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date (the “Monthly Redemption Amounts”). The Monthly Redemption Amounts can be paid in cash or in shares, subject to certain restrictions. If we choose to make any Monthly Redemption Amount payment in shares of common stock, the price per share is the lesser of the conversion price then in effect and 85% of the weighted average price for the ten trading days prior to the due date of the Monthly Redemption Amount.
 

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The performance of our duties and obligations under the debentures are secured by substantially all of our assets under a security agreement. As additional security to the debenture holders, we have also pledged the shares we hold in our subsidiaries, including 51% of BioCheck, Inc., and all of the shares of capital stock of our wholly-owned subsidiaries, OXIS Therapeutics, Inc. and OXIS Isle of Man Limited. In addition, OXIS Therapeutics, Inc. and OXIS Isle of Man Limited, have each entered into a subsidiary guarantee under which these subsidiaries have guaranteed the performance, at the parent level, of our obligations under the debentures.
 
Under the debentures, we agreed that we will not incur additional indebtedness for borrowed money, other than the Bridge Bank Promissory Note which has now been paid off. We also covenant that we will not pledge, grant or convey any new liens on its assets. The obligation to pay all unpaid principal will be accelerated upon an event of default, including upon failure to perform its obligations under the Debenture covenants, failure to make required payments, default on any of the Transaction Documents or any other material agreement, lease, document or instrument to which we are obligated, the bankruptcy of OXIS or related events. The Purchasers have a right of first refusal to participate in up to 100% of any future financing undertaken by us until the later of the date that the debentures are no longer outstanding and the one year anniversary of the effective date of the registration statement. We are restricted from issuing shares of common stock or instruments convertible into common stock for 90 days after the effective date of the registration statement with certain exceptions. We are also prohibited from affecting any subsequent financing involving a variable rate transaction until such time as no Purchaser holds any of the debentures. In addition, until such time as any Purchaser holds any of the securities issued in the Debenture transaction, if we issue or sell any common stock or instruments convertible into common stock which a Purchaser reasonably believes is on terms more favorable to such investors than the terms pursuant to the Transaction Documents, we are obligated to amend the terms of the Transaction Documents to such Purchaser the benefit of such better terms. We may prepay the entire outstanding principal amount of the debentures, plus accrued interest and other amounts payable, at our option at any time without penalty, provided that a registration statement is available for the resale of shares underlying the debentures and warrants, as more fully described in the debentures. The purpose of this Debenture transaction is to provide us with intermediate term financing as we seek longer term financing.
 
On October 25, 2006 in conjunction with the signing of the Purchase Agreement, we issued to the Purchasers five year Series A warrants to purchase an aggregate of 2,420,357 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share, one year Series B warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.385 per share, and two year Series C warrants to purchase an aggregate of 4,840,714 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. In addition, we issued to the Purchasers Series D and E warrants which become exercisable on a pro-rata basis only upon the exercise of the Series C warrants. The six year Series D warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock have an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. The six year Series E warrants to purchase 2,420,357 shares of common stock have an initial exercise price of $0.385 per share. The initial exercise prices for each warrant are adjustable pursuant to a full ratchet anti-dilution provision and upon the occurrence of a stock split or a related event.
 
Pursuant to the registration rights agreement, we filed a registration statement covering the public resale of the shares underlying the Series A, B, C, D and E warrants and the debentures. This registration statement was declared effective by the Securities and Exchange Commission in February 2007.
 
Under the security agreement, we agreed to grant to each of the investors a security interest in substantially all of our assets. We also agreed to pledge our respective ownership interests in our wholly-owned subsidiaries, OXIS Therapeutics, OXIS Isle of Man, and our partial subsidiary, BioCheck, Inc. OXIS Therapeutics and OXIS Isle of Man also provided a subsidiary guarantee to the Purchasers in connection with the transaction.
 

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Stockholder Approval

On August 1, 2006, at the OXIS 2006 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, the five nominated directors were re-elected, the proposal to amend the Company’s Certificate of Incorporation to increase the number of authorized shares of common stock from 95,000,000 to 150,000,000 was approved, and the proposal to increase the number of shares reserved for issuance under the OXIS 2003 Stock Incentive Plan from 3,600,000 shares to 5,600,000 shares was also approved by the stockholders.

License Agreement with Alteon

OXIS entered into an Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement with Alteon, Inc. with an effective date of April 5, 2007. Pursuant to the license agreement OXIS grants Alteon an exclusive, sole, worldwide license to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds covered by certain patent rights, with the right to sublicense. This license agreement amends and supersedes the Exclusive License and Supply Agreement previously entered into between OXIS and HaptoGuard, Inc. (now part of Alteon) on September 28, 2004, as amended. Alteon’s lead compound under the previous license, ALT-2074 (formerly BXT 51072) is currently in a Phase 2 clinical study for cardiovascular indications and is one of a family of licensed compounds that are orally bioavailable organoselenium compounds that have demonstrated potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in clinical and preclinical studies. Unlike the previous license agreement with HaptoGuard, in this Amended and Restated Exclusive License Agreement, the license is not limited in relation to particular clinical indications. Under the license agreement, Alteon is responsible for funding product development programs with respect to the licensed compounds. OXIS shall receive a non-refundable up-front license fee of $500,000 and Alteon is obligated to pay royalties on net sales of licensed products, with certain adjustments under certain conditions, as well as additional fees for the achievement of certain development and regulatory approval milestones. There can be no assurances that royalty payments will result or that milestone payments will be realized. In addition, within 14 days of the effective date of the license agreement, Alteon will purchase shares of common stock at a premium to the market price in the aggregate amount of $500,000. Alteon shall control, prosecute and maintain all licensed patents and shall be responsible for all costs and expenses in connection with the filing, prosecution and maintenance of the licensed patents.

As a part of the agreement, Alteon agreed to make an equity investment in our common stock, at a per-share price equal to 125% of the ten-day average trading price following the effective date of the agreement and no less than $0.24 per share, resulting in net proceeds to us of $500,000.

We have the right to terminate the license agreement if Alteon fails to pay us any required payments under the license agreement and such failure is not cured after written notice. Alteon may terminate the agreement by providing us with 180 days’ written notice. Either party may terminate the agreement upon 30 days’ written notice upon certain events relating to the other party’s bankruptcy, insolvency, dissolution, winding up or assignment for the benefit of creditors, or upon the other party’s uncured breach of any material provision of the agreement. Otherwise, the license agreement terminates upon the expiration of the underlying patents relating to the licensed compounds, on a country by country basis.

Agreements with Ambient Advisors LLC

On May 12, 2006, we entered into an engagement letter with Ambient Advisors LLC, (“Ambient Advisors”). Gary M. Post, a member of the board of directors, is the manager of Ambient Advisors. Ambient Advisors provided certain services pertaining to strategic planning, investor communications and financing strategies and other projects at the request of our chief executive officer for a one year period in return for monthly compensation of $5,000. We granted Ambient Advisors a ten year warrant to purchase 108,000 shares of OXIS common stock at an exercise price of $0.39 per share, with 9,000 shares becoming exercisable each month over the term of the agreement. On October 12, 2006, we mutually agreed with Gary M. Post to terminate the engagement letter with Ambient Advisors LLC, effective October 15, 2006, replace it with a new consulting agreement and accelerate the vesting of the warrant to be fully vested effective October 15, 2006.


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On November 6, 2006, we entered into an advisory agreement with Ambient Advisors that commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006, or the Commencement Date. Ambient Advisors will provide certain services pertaining to operations, strategic planning, financial planning and budgeting, investor relations, corporate finance and such additional roles and responsibilities as requested for a three year period from the Commencement Date, after this period on a year-to-year basis. Ambient Advisors will receive annual compensation in the amount of $83,333, payable quarterly in advance in cash, common stock based on a price equal to 85% of average of the five closing prices for the five trading days prior to the date that the issuance was first authorized by the board of directors in November 2006, or in ten year warrants equal to that number of warrants equal to 1.5 times the number of shares that would otherwise be received. For the initial quarterly payment, Ambient Advisors received a ten year warrant to purchase 173,608 shares of common stock with an exercise price of $0.20 per share, vesting immediately. As part of the compensation, we granted Ambient Advisors a ten year common stock purchase warrant to purchase 550,000 shares of OXIS common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, vesting as follows: (i) 275,000 warrant shares vesting in four equal quarterly installments commencing on January 15, 2007 and every three months thereafter and (ii) and the remaining 275,000 warrant shares vesting in eight quarterly installments over two years. Additionally, OXIS granted Ambient Advisors, as a sign on bonus, a non-qualified option to purchase 333,333 shares at exercise price of $0.20 per share, with vesting in six equal installments, commencing on November 14, 2006, through the 180th day after the Commencement Date. During the three year term of the agreement, Ambient Advisors will receive an annual bonus based upon the attainment of agreed upon goals and milestones as determined by the board of directors and its compensation committee. During the remainder of calendar year 2006, Ambient Advisors’ bonus will be pro rated on an annual bonus rate in the range of 25% to 50% of the advisory fee, and the bonus for subsequent years of the term of the agreement will be in a similar target range. The bonuses payable hereunder will be paid in cash, although at Ambient Advisors’ sole option, they may be paid in stock (or in the form of ten year warrants with cashless exercise provisions, with 1.5 times the number of warrant shares to be issued in lieu of the number of shares of common stock), based upon the average of the closing bid and asked prices for the 5 trading days immediately prior to the awarding to Ambient Advisor of the bonus for a particular year.
 
Appointment of New President and Chief Executive Officer

On September 15, 2006, our board of directors appointed Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. as President and Chief Executive Officer of OXIS. Dr. Hausman remains the Chairman of the board of directors.

On October 12, 2006, we mutually agreed with Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. to terminate the consulting agreement with NW Medical Research Partners, of which Dr. Hausman is the sole member and manager, effective October 15, 2006. Under the consulting agreement dated October 1, 2005, Dr. Hausman provided certain services pertaining to licensing of intellectual property, development of potential products, financing activities and other issues at the request of our Chief Executive Officer. In conjunction with the termination of the consulting agreement, the board of directors approved the issuance of 330,769 shares of restricted common stock to Dr. Hausman in lieu of cash payment of $67,000 in fees and expenses due under the consulting agreement to the date of termination.


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On November 6, 2006, we entered into an employment agreement with Dr. Hausman that commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006. Dr. Hausman will serve as our President and Chief Executive Officer for a three year period from the commencement date of October 15, 2006, and after this period on a year-to-year basis. Dr. Hausman will receive annual compensation in the amount of $250,000, payable quarterly in advance in cash, common stock based on a price equal to 85% of average of the five closing prices for the five trading days prior to the date that the issuance is authorized by the board of directors, or in ten year warrants equal to that number of warrants equal to 1.5 times the number of shares that would otherwise be received. For the initial quarterly payment, Dr. Hausman was issued 347,222 restricted shares of common stock. During the three year term of the agreement, Dr. Hausman will receive an annual bonus based upon the attainment of agreed upon goals and milestones as determined by the board of directors and its compensation committee. During the remainder of calendar year 2006, Dr. Hausman’s bonus will be pro rated on an annual bonus rate in the range of 25% to 50% of his base salary, and the bonus for subsequent years of the term of the agreement will be in a similar target range. The bonuses payable hereunder will be paid in cash, although at Dr. Hausman’s sole option, they may be paid in stock (or in the form of ten year warrants with cashless exercise provisions, with 1.5 times the number of warrant shares to be issued in lieu of the number of shares of common stock), based upon the average of the closing bid and asked prices for the 5 trading days immediately prior to the awarding to Dr. Hausman of the bonus for a particular year. Once we have raised at least $2.5 million in one or more financings (equity, debt or convertible debt, in addition to the financing closed on October 25, 2006) or in a strategic transaction, Dr. Hausman may elect, at any time, in lieu of receiving a quarterly issuance of stock (or warrants in lieu thereof), to receive his base salary in cash, payable monthly on our regular pay cycle for professional employees. As part of the compensation, we granted Dr. Hausman a ten year a non-qualified option to purchase 495,000 shares of OXIS common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, vesting as follows: (i) 247,500 option shares vesting in four equal quarterly installments commencing on January 15, 2007 and every three months thereafter and (ii) and the remaining 247,500 option shares vesting in eight quarterly installments over two years. Additionally, we granted Dr. Hausman, as a sign on bonus, 500,000 restricted shares of common stock and a ten year common stock purchase warrant to purchase 1,505,000 shares at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, with vesting in six equal installments, commencing on November 14, 2006, through the 180th day after the Commencement Date.
 
We are providing Dr. Hausman with an annual office expense allowance of $50,000, for the costs of maintaining an office in the Stevenson, Washington area, payable quarterly in advance in the form of common stock, at a price equal to 85% of the market price. For the first installment, representing $12,500 of the office expense allowance, Dr. Hausman was issued 69,444 restricted shares of common stock. Once we have completed a qualifying financing, the office expense allowance will be paid in cash in advance, commencing for the quarter next following the quarter in which the Qualifying Financing occurred. Additionally, Dr. Hausman will receive family health and dental insurance benefits and short-term and long-term disability policies.

Consulting Agreement with John E. Repine, M.D.

On November 6, 2006, we entered into a consulting agreement with John E. Repine, M.D. that commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006.


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Dr. Repine will advise us concerning matters of antioxidant and inflammation research and potential acquisitions (including products/compounds/intellectual property, companies), product research and development, and the development and establishment of reference labs for oxidative stress and inflammatory reactions for a three year period from the commencement date of October 15, 2006, and after this period on a year-to-year basis. Dr. Repine will receive annual compensation in the amount of $36,000, payable quarterly in advance in cash, common stock based on a price equal to 85% of average of the five closing prices for the five trading days prior to the date that the issuance was first authorized by the board of directors in November 2006, or in ten year warrants equal to that number of warrants equal to 1.5 times the number of shares that would otherwise be received. For the initial quarterly payment, Dr. Repine received 50,000 restricted shares of common stock. As part of the compensation under the consulting agreement, OXIS granted Dr. Repine a ten year stock option to purchase 200,000 shares of OXIS common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, vesting as follows: (i) 100,000 option shares vesting in four equal quarterly installments commencing on January 15, 2007 and every three months thereafter and (ii) and the remaining 100,000 option shares vesting in eight quarterly installments over two years. Additionally, we granted Dr. Repine, as a sign on bonus, a non-qualified option to purchase 200,000 shares at exercise price of $0.20 per share, with vesting in six equal installments, commencing on November 14, 2006, through the 180th day after the Commencement Date. During the term of the consulting agreement, Dr. Repine is eligible to receive annual and special bonuses based upon the attainment of agreed upon goals and milestones as determined by our Chief Executive Officer. Each bonus payable will be paid in cash, although at Dr. Repine’s sole option, such bonus may be paid in stock (or in the form of ten year warrants with cashless exercise provisions, with 1.5 times the number of warrant shares to be issued in lieu of the number of shares of common stock), based upon the average of the closing bid and asked prices for the 5 trading days immediately prior to the awarding to Dr. Repine of the particular bonus.
 
Preferred Stock Conversion

During 2005, 85,678 shares of common stock were issued for the conversion and cancellation of all 428,389 outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock that were valued at $4,000.

Note Conversion

During April 2005, 459,355 shares of common stock were issued for cancellation of a note payable for $160,000 and accrued interest of $84,000.

Management Team and Board of Directors

On February 28, 2005, Steve T. Guillen was appointed as our President and Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Guillen replaced Marvin S. Hausman, M.D., as acting Chief Executive Officer and Dr. Hausman remained as Chairman of the board of directors. During October 2005 John Repine, M.D., Chief Executive Officer, President and Scientific Director of the Webb-Waring Institute for Cancer, Aging and Antioxidant Research joined our board of directors. Effective December 6, 2005, Dr. John Chen entered into an executive employment agreement with us as President of BioCheck. Michael D. Centron was appointed as our Vice President and Chief Financial Officer during January 2006, replacing Dr. Hausman as acting Chief Financial Officer. During February 2006, Randall Moeckli was appointed as our Senior Director of Sales and Marketing. On March 15, 2006, Gary M. Post, Managing Director of Ambient Advisors, LLC, joined our board of directors. Timothy C. Rodell, M.D., declined to stand for re-election at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders held on August 1, 2006. On September 15, 2006, Steven T. Guillen’s employment as the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer was terminated. Mr. Guillen remained a member of the board of directors. On September 15, 2006, Marvin S. Hausman, M.D., was appointed by the board of directors as President and Chief Executive Officer of the Company. Dr. Hausman remains Chairman of the board of directors. Mr. Centron resigned as an officer and employee effective November 15, 2006.  On April 12, 2007, Mr. Guillen resigned from the board of directors.

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Loan Repayment

On June 1, 2004, we received $1,200,000 in exchange for a note and entered into a loan agreement with our majority stockholder at that time, Axonyx, Inc. We repaid the note on January 6, 2005.

Acquisition of BioCheck

On September 19, 2005, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with BioCheck and its stockholders to purchase all of its common stock for $6.0 million in cash. BioCheck is a leading producer of enzyme immunoassay diagnostic kits for clinical laboratories. On December 6, 2005, we purchased 51% of the shares of BioCheck’s common stock from each of its stockholders on a pro rata basis for $3,060,000 in cash. This acquisition was accounted for by the purchase method of accounting according to Statement of Financial Accounting Standards No. 141, “Business Combinations.” The consolidated statements of operations include the results of operations of BioCheck from December 6, 2005, the date of acquisition, and the consolidated balance sheets include the assets and liabilities of BioCheck at December 31, 2005 and December 31, 2006. The purchase price of $3,337,000 was based on cash paid to BioCheck’s stockholders of $3,060,000, legal expense of $155,000 and a finder’s fee of $122,000. Pursuant to the stock purchase agreement, OXIS will use its reasonable best efforts to consummate a follow-on financing transaction to raise additional capital with which to purchase the remaining outstanding shares of BioCheck in one or more additional closings.

Mutual Services Agreement with BioCheck

On June 23, 2006, we entered into a mutual services agreement with BioCheck. Each of OXIS and BioCheck will provide certain services to the other corporation to be charged monthly at an hourly rate with an overhead surcharge. The services that BioCheck will provide include assisting in manufacturing the bulk of our research assay test kits, assisting in packaging and shipping such research assay test kits to our customers, and undertaking research and development of certain new OXIS research assay test kits on a case-by-case basis to be agreed upon between the parties. We will provide services to BioCheck, including marketing and sales, website management and materials requirement and control systems.

The agreement terminates on December 6, 2009, or earlier upon mutual consent of the parties, upon 90 day prior written notice by either party, by either party if a monthly billing is unpaid after 60 days if a 15 day notice and opportunity to cure has been provided, or upon a material breach of the Agreement after 30 days’ notice and opportunity to cure the breach.

Results of Operations

Our revenues and expenses increased substantially from 2005 to 2006 with the consolidation of all of BioCheck’s results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2006. Only one month of BioCheck’s revenues and expenses are included in the results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2005 because they were not acquired until December 6, 2005.


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Revenues

The following table presents the changes in revenues from 2005 to 2006:

         
Increase (Decrease) from 2005
     
2006
 
2005
 
Amount
 
%
Product revenues
$
5,201,000
$
2,397,000
$
2,804,000
 
117%
License revenues
 
575,000
 
100,000
 
475,000
 
475%
Total revenues
$
5,776,000
$
2,497,000
$
3,279,000
 
131%
 
For the three year ended December 31, 2006 the increase in revenues was primarily attributable to the consolidation of $4,282,000 of revenues from BioCheck partially offset by a $729,000 decrease in sales from the OXIS parent company. The decrease in OXIS parent company sales is attributable to lower sales volume that was caused, in part, by the interruption arising from moving operations from Portland, Oregon to Foster City, California and consolidating our product offerings. We expect 2007 product revenues to increase modestly from 2006 as we introduce new products such as our improved MPO. We intend to develop new diagnostic test kits and evaluate our product offerings, pricing and distribution network with the plan of increasing sales volume.
 
Cost of Product Revenues

The following table presents the changes in cost of product revenues from 2005 to 2006:
 
         
Increase (Decrease) from 2005
     
2006
 
2005
 
Amount
 
%
Cost of product revenues
$
3,084,000
$
1,345,000
$
1,739,000
 
129%

For the year ended December 31, 2006, the increase in cost of product revenues is attributable to the consolidation of $2,203,000 of costs from the operations of BioCheck that were partially offset by a decrease from the OXIS parent company due to the decrease in sales.

Gross profit of $2,692,000 in 2006 was significantly higher than the gross profit of $1,152,000 in 2005 because the additional gross profits generated from BioCheck. Gross profit as a percentage of revenues remained constant at approximately 46%.

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Research and Development Expenses

The following table presents the changes in research and development expenses from 2005 to 2006:

         
Increase (Decrease) from 2005
     
2006
 
2005
 
Amount
 
%
Research and development
$
708,000
$
499,000
$
209,000
 
42%
 
For the year ended December 31, 2006, the increase in research and development expenses is primarily attributable to the consolidation of $518,000 of costs from the operations of BioCheck and increased patent amortization expense of $94,000. The increase was partially offset by decreased salary and benefits costs and direct project expenses. We expect 2007 research and development costs to be approximately the same as 2006. However, the actual amount of research and development expenses will fluctuate with the availability of funding.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

The following table presents the changes in selling, general and administrative expenses from 2005 to 2006:
 
         
Increase (Decrease) from 2005
     
2006
 
2005
 
Amount
 
%
Selling, general and administrative
$
4,654,000
$
2,342,000
$
2,312,000
 
99%
 
For the year ended December 31, 2006, the increase in selling, general and administrative expenses is primarily attributed to the consolidation of costs from the operations of BioCheck of $1,170,000, severance charges and increased costs for accounting, legal, stockholder communication and investor relations activities; labor and related costs including contract labor and associated transportation costs; and non-cash compensation. We expect 2007 selling, general and administrative expenses to be approximately the same as 2006.

Purchased In-process Research and Development

In connection with our acquisition of 51% of the outstanding shares of BioCheck on December 6, 2005, $1.5 million of purchased in-process research and development was identified as an intangible asset. The applicable research projects were subsequently deemed not to have future uses or markets. As such, this identified intangible asset was expensed in 2005 at the date of acquisition.
Financing Fees

In connection with the $1,350,000 convertible debenture in October 2006, we incurred non-cash financing charges of $1,674,000 related to the warrants and beneficial conversion feature of the notes.


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Interest Expense

Interest expense of $484,000 during the year ended December 31, 2006 was primarily due to the loan with KeyBank that was transferred to Bridge Bank incurred in connection with the BioCheck acquisition, the addition of new debt of $600,000 in March 2006 and the convertible debenture in October 2006 and non-cash financing expense of $166,000 related to the renewal of a note with Fagan Capital.
 
Liquidity and Capital Resources 

On a consolidated basis, we had cash and cash equivalents of $1,208,000 at December 31, 2006 of which $792,000 was held by BioCheck. The cash held by us of $416,000 at December 31, 2006 is not sufficient to sustain our operations through the first half of 2007 without additional financings. Since BioCheck has been and is expected to continue to be cash flow positive, management believes that BioCheck’s cash will be sufficient to sustain BioCheck’s operating activities for the next 12 months. We cannot access the cash held by our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, to pay for our parent level operating expenses. During March 2006, we received $200,000 from Steven T. Guillen, our President and Chief Executive Officer in exchange for a promissory note and we entered into a Promissory Note, or Note, with Fagan Capital, Inc., pursuant to which Fagan Capital loaned us $400,000. Both of these notes were repaid from the proceeds of our $1,350,000 convertible debenture offering in October 2006. In addition, in connection with the license agreement between Alteon and us, Alteon agreed to make an equity investment in our common stock, at a per-share price equal to 125% of the ten-day average trading price following the effective date of the agreement and no less than $0.24 per share, resulting in net proceeds to us of $500,000.
 
The current rate of cash usage at our parent level raises substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern, absent any new sources of significant cash flows. In an effort to mitigate this near-term concern, we obtained debt financing in which we received proceeds of $1,350,000 in October 2006 and we are seeking additional equity financing to obtain sufficient funds to sustain operations . From this debt financing, $635,000 was used to repay existing debt, accrued interest and related legal fees. We plan to increase revenues by introducing new products. However, we cannot provide assurance that we will successfully obtain equity or other financing, if any, sufficient to finance our goals or that we will increase product related revenues. Our financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary in the event that we cannot continue in existence.

During 2005 we spent $3.2 million on the acquisition of 51% of BioCheck’s common stock and $3.1 million on a restricted certificate of deposit at KeyBank, which was used as collateral under the loan agreement with KeyBank. Capital expenditures were $64,000 and $33,000 in 2006 and 2005 respectively. We had no commitments for capital expenditure at December 31, 2006. We anticipate that in 2007 the BioCheck manufacturing facility in Foster City, California will require expenditures to support our business objective. We spent $44,000 and $172,000 to file patents in 2006 and 2005, respectively.

Net cash provided by financing activities

On June 1, 2004, we received $1,200,000 in exchange for a note and entered into a loan agreement with our majority stockholder at the time, Axonyx, Inc. We repaid the note on January 6, 2005. In a $6,500,000 private placement of our common stock on December 30, 2004, we received net proceeds of $5,818,000 in exchange for 12,264,158 shares of common stock which were issuable at December 31, 2004.


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On December 2, 2005, we entered into non-revolving one-year loan agreement with KeyBank in the amount of $3,060,000, for the purpose of completing the initial closing of the BioCheck acquisition. This loan was repaid during February 2006 and a new one-year loan agreement for $3,060,000 was entered into at Bridge Bank. Steven T. Guillen, our -president and chief executive officer at that time, purchased 600,000 shares of common stock for $240,000, pursuant to the terms of an employment agreement on February 28, 2005. This loan has since been repaid.

On October 25, 2006, we completed a private placement of debentures and warrants under a securities purchase agreement with four accredited investors. In this financing we issued secured convertible debentures in an aggregate principal amount of $1,694,250 (referred to in this prospectus as the “debentures”), and Series A, B, C, D, and E common stock warrants (referred to in this prospectus as the “warrants”). We also provided the investors registration rights under a registration rights agreement, and a security interest in our assets under a security agreement to secure performance of our duties and obligations under the debentures. Under the warrants, the investors have the right to purchase an aggregate of approximately 14.5 million shares of our common stock, at initial exercise prices ranging from $0.35 to $0.385 per share, and these exercise prices are adjustable according to a full ratchet anti-dilution provision, i.e., the exercise price may be adjusted downward in the event that we conduct a financing at a price per share below $0.35 or $0.385 per share, respectively. The Series D and E warrants are only exercisable pro rata subsequent to the exercise of the Series C warrants. The debentures were issued with an original issue discount of 20.318%, and resulted in proceeds to us of $1,350,000. The debentures are convertible, at the option of the holders, at any time into shares of common stock at $0.35 per share, as adjusted in accordance with a full ratchet anti-dilution provision (referred to in this prospectus as the “conversion price”). Beginning on the first of the month following the earlier of the effective date of the registration statement to be filed pursuant to the registration rights agreement and February 1, 2007, we will amortize the debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date (the “Monthly Redemption Amounts”). The Monthly Redemption Amounts can be paid in cash or in shares, subject to certain restrictions. If we choose to make any Monthly Redemption Amount payment in shares of common stock, the price per share is the lesser of the conversion price then in effect and 85% of the weighted average price for the ten trading days prior to the due date of the Monthly Redemption Amount.

On March 10, 2006, we received $200,000 in exchange for an unsecured promissory note with Steven T. Guillen, our president and chief executive officer at that time. The related party note bears interest at 7.0%. Interest and principal were due on September 10, 2006. Mr. Guillen’s employment was terminated on September 15, 2006. We were in default on this note at December 31, 2006. Subsequent to December 31, 2006, Mr. Guillen sued the Company for payment of interest and principal due under the note. On November 2, 2006, we repaid the principal and accrued interest due on the promissory note with Mr. Guillen in the amount of $209,000.

On March 31, 2006, we issued a $400,000 unsecured promissory note to Fagan Capital. Interest accrues at an annual rate of 8.0% and interest and principal were due on June 2, 2006. On July 26, 2006, Fagan Capital extended the maturity date of the promissory note to June 1, 2007 and we issued to Fagan Capital a warrant to purchase 1,158,857 shares of common stock at an initial exercise price of $0.35 per share. On October 25, 2006, we prepaid the principal, accrued interest and legal fees due in the amount of $426,000.

Commitments and Contingencies

Our partial subsidiary, BioCheck, leases facilities under operating leases in Foster City, California that expire in December 2008. During 2004, BioCheck entered into a sublease of an unused Foster City, California facility to the end of the lease term in 2008 that reduced our operating lease commitments. Net minimum lease payments to which we are committed under these leases at December 31, 2005 are $227,000 in 2006, $201,000 in 2007 and $208,000 in 2008. In addition, we entered into an operating lease for 4,136 square feet of space adjacent to space occupied by our BioCheck subsidiary in Foster City, California starting on April 1, 2006 and ending on March 31, 2009. The annual base rent under the lease agreement begins at $62,000 per year and increases incrementally to $66,000 by the end of the lease term.


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On September 19, 2005, we entered into a stock purchase agreement with BioCheck and its stockholders to purchase all of its common stock for $6.0 million in cash. On December 6, 2005, we purchased 51% of the common stock of BioCheck. Pursuant to the stock purchase agreement, we will use our reasonable best efforts to consummate a follow-on financing transaction to raise additional capital with which to purchase the remaining outstanding shares of BioCheck in one or more additional closings. The purchase price will be increased by an additional 8% per annum from December 6, 2005. If we have not purchased all of the outstanding shares of BioCheck within twelve months of December 6, 2005, the earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization expenses, if any, of BioCheck, will be used to repurchase the remaining outstanding BioCheck shares at one or more additional closings.

As described above, on October 25, 2006 we completed a convertible debenture and warrant financing under a securities purchase agreement with accredited investors. In this financing, we issued secured convertible debentures in an aggregate principal amount of $1,694,250. We also provided the investors registration rights under a registration rights agreement, and a security interest in our assets under a security agreement to secure to secure the performance of our duties and obligations under the debentures. The debentures were issued with an original issue discount of 20.318%, and resulted in proceeds to us of $1,350,000. The debentures are convertible, at the option of the holders, at any time into shares of common stock at $0.35 per share, as adjusted in accordance with a full ratchet anti-dilution provision (referred to in this prospectus as the “conversion price”). Beginning on the first of the month following the earlier of the effective date of the registration statement to be filed pursuant to the registration rights agreement and February 1, 2007, we will amortize the debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date (the “Monthly Redemption Amounts”). The Monthly Redemption Amounts can be paid in cash or in shares, subject to certain restrictions. If we choose to make any Monthly Redemption Amount payment in shares of common stock, the price per share is the lesser of the conversion price then in effect and 85% of the weighted average price for the ten trading days prior to the due date of the Monthly Redemption Amount.
The performance of our duties and obligations under the debentures are secured by substantially all of our assets under a security agreement. As additional security to the debenture holders, we have also pledged the shares we hold in our subsidiaries, including 51% of BioCheck, Inc., and all of the shares of capital stock of our wholly-owned subsidiaries, OXIS Therapeutics, Inc. and OXIS Isle of Man Limited. In addition, OXIS Therapeutics, Inc. and OXIS Isle of Man Limited, have each entered into a subsidiary guarantee under which these subsidiaries have guaranteed the performance, at the parent level, of our obligations under the debentures.

Critical Accounting Policies

Our accounting policies are explained in Note 1 to the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2006 included in this Form 10KSB. We consider the following accounting policies to be critical given they involve estimates and judgments made by management and are important for our investors’ understanding of our operating results and financial condition.

Basis of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements contained in this prospectus include the accounts of OXIS International, Inc. and its subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated. On December 6, 2005, we purchased 51% of the common stock of BioCheck. This acquisition was accounted for by the purchase method of accounting according to Statement of Financial Accounting Standards, or SFAS, No. 141, “Business Combinations.” The consolidated statements of operations include the results of operations of BioCheck from December 6, 2005, the date of acquisition, and the consolidated balance sheets include the assets and liabilities of BioCheck at December 31, 2006.


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Revenue Recognition

We manufacture, or have manufactured on a contract basis, research and diagnostic assays and fine chemicals, which are our primary products sold to customers. Revenue from the sale of our products, including shipping fees, is recognized when title to the products is transferred to the customer which usually occurs upon shipment or delivery, depending upon the terms of the sales order and when collectibility is reasonably assured. Revenue from sales to distributors of our products is recognized, net of allowances, upon delivery of product to the distributors. According to the terms of individual distributor contracts, a distributor may return product up to a maximum amount and under certain conditions contained in its contract. Allowances are calculated based upon historical data, current economic conditions and the underlying contractual terms. Our mix of product sales are substantially at risk to market conditions and demand, which may change at anytime.
We recognize license fee revenue for licenses to our intellectual property when earned under the terms of the agreements. Generally, revenue is recognized upon transfer of the license unless we have continuing obligations for which fair value cannot be established, in which case the revenue is recognized over the period of the obligation. We consider all arrangements with payment terms extending beyond 12 months not to be fixed or determinable. In certain licensing arrangements there is provision for a variable fee as well as a non-refundable minimum amount. In such arrangements, the amount of the non-refundable minimum guarantee is recognized upon transfer of the license and collectibility is reasonably assured or over the period of the obligation, as applicable, and the amount of the variable fee is recognized as revenue when it is fixed and determinable. We recognize royalty revenue based on reported sales by third party licensees of products containing our materials, software and intellectual property. Non-refundable royalties, for which there are no further performance obligations, are recognized when due under the terms of the agreements.

Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost to purchase and/or manufacture the inventory or the current estimated market value of the inventory. We regularly review our inventory quantities on hand and record a provision for excess and obsolete inventory based primarily on our estimated forecast of product demand and/or our ability to sell the products and production requirements. Demand for our products can fluctuate significantly. Factors which could affect demand for our products include unanticipated changes in consumer preferences, general market conditions or other factors, which may result in cancellations of advance orders or a reduction in the rate of reorders placed by customers and/or continued weakening of economic conditions. Additionally, our estimates of future product demand may be inaccurate, which could result in an understated or overstated provision required for excess and obsolete inventory. Our estimates are based upon our understanding of historical relationships which can change at anytime.

Long-Lived Assets

Our long-lived assets include property, plant and equipment, capitalized costs of filing patent applications and goodwill and other assets. See Notes 1, 4, 5 and 6 to the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2005 included in this prospectus for more detail regarding our long-lived assets. We evaluate our long-lived assets for impairment in accordance with SFAS No. 144, “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets” whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable. Estimates of future cash flows and timing of events for evaluating long-lived assets for impairment are based upon management’s judgment. If any of our intangible or long-lived assets are considered to be impaired, the amount of impairment to be recognized is the excess of the carrying amount of the assets over its fair value.


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Applicable long-lived assets are amortized or depreciated over the shorter of their estimated useful lives, the estimated period that the assets will generate revenue, or the statutory or contractual term in the case of patents. Estimates of useful lives and periods of expected revenue generation are reviewed periodically for appropriateness and are based upon management’s judgment. Goodwill and other assets are not amortized.
 
Certain Expenses and Liabilities

On an ongoing basis, management evaluates its estimates related to certain expenses and accrued liabilities. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Share-Based Compensation

In December 2004, the FASB issued SFAS 123R, which replaces FASB Statement No. 123, “Accounting for Stock-Based Compensation”, and supersedes APB Opinion No. 25, “Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees,” or APB Opinion No. 25. SFAS 123R establishes standards for the accounting for share-based payment transactions in which an entity exchanges its equity instruments for goods or services. It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments. SFAS 123R covers a wide range of share-based compensation arrangements including share options, restricted share plans, performance-based awards, share appreciation rights and employee share purchase plans. SFAS 123R requires a public entity to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award on the grant date (with limited exceptions). That cost will be recognized in the entity’s financial statements over the period during which the employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award. Management implemented SFAS 123R effective January 1, 2006. Methodologies used for calculations such as the Black-Scholes option-pricing models and variables such as volatility and expected life are based upon management’s judgment. Such methodologies and variables are reviewed and updated periodically for appropriateness and affect the amount of recorded charges.

Inflation 

We believe that inflation has not had a material adverse impact on our business or operating results during the periods presented.

Off-balance Sheet Arrangements

We have no off-balance sheet arrangements.

Changes or Disagreements with Accountants

There were no changes in, or disagreements with, our independent registered public accounting firm during 2005 or 2006.



39


RISK FACTORS


Risks Related to Our Business
 
We operate in a rapidly changing environment that involves a number of risks, some of which are beyond our control. The following discussion highlights some of these risks and others are discussed elsewhere in this Report.

We will need to raise additional capital to fund our general and administrative expenses, and if we are unable to raise such capital, we will have to curtail or cease operations.
 
We had cash and cash equivalents of $416,000 at our parent level at December 31, 2006. We cannot access the cash held by our majority-held subsidiary, BioCheck, to pay for our operating expenses at the parent level, since currently BioCheck is not our wholly-owned subsidiary. We obtained debt financing in the amount of $1,350,000 on October 25, 2006 and are seeking additional equity financing to obtain sufficient funds to sustain operations, including our development and commercialization programs and purchase the remaining 49% share of BioCheck that we currently do not own. We have incurred significant obligations in relation to the termination of our former president and chief executive officer. We repaid debt including accrued interest and expenses in the amount of $426,000 to Fagan Capital and $209,000 to our former chief executive officer. If we are unable to raise additional capital in 2007, we may have to curtail or cease operations.   If we raise short term capital by incurring additional debt, we will have to obtain equity financing sufficient to repay such debt and accrued interest. Further, incurring additional debt may make it more difficult for us to successfully consummate future equity financings.

Restrictive provisions of the Securities Purchase Agreement signed with purchasers of debentures and warrants in our recent convertible debt and warrant financing may prohibit us from consummating an equity financing transaction.

Pursuant to the Securities Purchase Agreement entered into with four accredited purchasers on October 25, 2006, we are prohibited from issuing shares of common stock or securities convertible into common stock except pursuant to options issued under its stock option plan and other limited exceptions, until ninety days after the effective date of the registration statement that we are required to file in relation to the securities issued in our October 25, 2006 financing, unless the volume weighted average quoted price of our common stock for each of the twenty days immediately prior to any such issuance of equity securities is higher than $0.40 per share, subject to adjustment for stock splits. Given the recent price range of our common stock between $0.20 and $0.35, unless the price of our common stock increases significantly within the next six to seven months, we will be unable to raise additional funds through an equity financing. Under the Securities Purchase Agreement in our October 25, 2006 financing, the purchasers of the debentures have the right to participate in up to 100% of any future equity financing involving issuance of common stock or securities convertible into or exercisable for common stock that we undertake within one year after the effective date of the registration statement which we are required to file in relation to the securities issued in our October 25, 2006 financing. This provision may make potential investors reluctant to enter into term sheets with us for future equity transactions.
 


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Repayment of recently issued debentures in shares and the exercise of recently issued warrants would cause substantial dilution to our stockholders and would likely to depress our stock price, making it more difficult for us to consummate future equity financings.

In our October 25, 2006 debenture financing with four accredited purchasers, we issued secured convertible debentures in an aggregate principal amount of $1,694,250. We also issued Series A, B, C, D, and E warrants to the purchasers of the debentures, which provide them the right to purchase of an aggregate of approximately 14.5 million shares of our common stock, at initial exercise prices ranging from $0.35 to $0.385 per share, subject to adjustment as provided in the warrants, including a full ratchet anti-dilution provision which will lower the exercise price in the event that we conduct a financing at a price per share below $0.35 or $0.385 per share, respectively. The Series D and E warrants are only exercisable on a pro rata basis, if the Series C warrants are exercised. The debentures were issued with an original issue discount of 20.318%, and resulted in proceeds to us of $1,350,000. The debentures are convertible, at the option of the holders, at any time into shares of common stock at $0.35 per share, as adjusted in accordance with a full ratchet anti-dilution provision (referred to in this report as the “conversion price”). Pursuant to the terms of the debentures, beginning on February 1, 2007, we began to amortize the debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date (the “Monthly Redemption Amounts”). The Monthly Redemption Amounts can be paid in cash or in shares, subject to certain restrictions. If we choose to make any Monthly Redemption Amount payment in shares of common stock, the price per share is the lesser of the conversion price then in effect and 85% of the weighted average price for the ten trading days prior to the due date of the Monthly Redemption Amount.

Due to the floating conversion price of the debentures that applies when we choose to repay the debentures in shares, we would need to issue approximately ten million shares to the holders of the debentures, assuming that stock prices remain in their recent price range. The number of shares that we may have to issue to the debenture holders could increase significantly if our stock price declines from the current price range. In addition, we would have to issue approximately five million shares if the debenture holders exercise their Series A and B warrants, an additional approximately five million shares would be issued upon exercise of their Series C warrants and finally, an additional approximately five million shares would be issued upon exercise of their Series D and E warrants pro rata subsequent to the exercise of the Series C warrants. The future potential dilution due to exercise of the above warrants could be increased if the full ratchet anti-dilution provision applicable to the exercise price of the warrants is triggered. This future potential dilution would likely depress our stock price, making it difficult for us to consummate a future equity financing.

As of March 31, 2007 we were in technical default under the October 2006 debentures, because of non-payment of the Monthly Redemption Amounts which became due beginning on February 1, 2007. We are currently in negotiations with the debenture holders regarding the form of payment of these Monthly Redemption Amounts, which may be in the form of shares of our common stock or cash.

Restrictions on our ability to repay the debentures in shares rather than in cash may deplete our cash resources and will require future financings to avoid default.

Under the terms of the debentures we issued in October 2006, our right to make monthly redemption payments is conditioned upon several factors. Beginning on February 1, 2007, we are obligated to amortize the debentures in equal installments on a monthly basis resulting in a complete repayment by the maturity date either in cash or in shares. The monthly redemptions, if made in cash to all debenture holders would equal approximately $85,000 per month. We may not make the monthly redemption in shares if, among other conditions, the issuance of the shares to the debenture holders would cause any debenture holder to beneficially own in excess of either 9.99% or 4.99% of our total outstanding shares at that time (depending on the particular debenture holder, either the 9.99% or the 4.99% threshold applies). One of the debenture holders currently beneficially owns approximately 9% of our total outstanding shares. In addition, we may not make monthly redemption payments to any debenture holder in shares rather than cash if the daily trading volume for our common stock does not exceed 50,000 shares per trading day for a period of twenty trading days prior to any applicable date in question beginning after April 25, 2007. If we must make all or a substantial amount of its monthly redemption payments to the debenture holders in cash rather than shares, its cash reserves will be depleted and it will have to raise substantial additional capital to avoid default of the debentures.

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As we have failed to make payments due to BioCheck under our Mutual Services Agreement, BioCheck could exercise its rights under the default provisions of that agreement to terminate the agreement and cease production of many of our research test kit assays.

As mentioned above, on June 23, 2006, we entered into a mutual services agreement with our majority owned subsidiary, BioCheck. Pursuant to the agreement, we agreed to pay BioCheck approximately $128,000 that we owed to BioCheck for services that BioCheck had provided to us during the twelve months ended September 30, 2006. As mutually agreed with BioCheck, we did not make this payment to BioCheck, and instead we agreed to use these funds to repurchase BioCheck shares from its current shareholders. If, however, we receive written notice of breach of the mutual services agreement due to non-payment of any other obligations, it will have 15 days to cure that breach. If we fail to cure the breach during the cure period, BioCheck would have the right to terminate the agreement. We currently manufacture the bulk of our research assay test kits together with BioCheck, which assists in packaging and shipping such research assay test kits to our customers, and undertaking research and development of certain new OXIS research assay test kits. If BioCheck ceases to perform these services, we will have to turn to third party suppliers for the manufacturing of its research assay test kits, where that is possible, and will likely have to cease research and development of new OXIS research assay test kits. There can be no assurance that possible third party suppliers of research assay test kits will be willing or able to manufacture our research assay test kits at competitive prices or at all, or that we would be able to pay for such services. Disruption or cessation of manufacturing due to the termination of the mutual services agreement would have immediate and deleterious effects on our future revenues.

Raising additional capital may be necessary in order to complete our acquisition of the outstanding shares of BioCheck that we do not own, which constitutes 49% of BioCheck’s issued and outstanding shares.

On September 19, 2005 we entered into a stock purchase agreement with BioCheck and the stockholders of BioCheck pursuant to which we undertook to purchase up to all of the outstanding shares of common stock of BioCheck for an aggregate purchase price of $6.0 million in cash. On December 6, 2005, pursuant to the terms of the stock purchase agreement with BioCheck, at the initial closing, we purchased an aggregate of fifty-one percent (51%) of the outstanding shares of common stock of BioCheck from each of the stockholders of BioCheck on a pro rata basis, for an aggregate of $3,060,000 in cash. Pursuant to the stock purchase agreement, we will use its reasonable best efforts to consummate a follow-on financing transaction to raise additional capital with which to purchase the remaining outstanding shares of BioCheck in one or more additional closings. The purchase price for any BioCheck shares purchased after the initial closing will be increased by an additional 8% per annum from the date of the initial closing through the date of such purchase. Under the terms of our purchase agreements with BioCheck and its stockholders, BioCheck’s earnings (specifically, its earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization expenses, or EBITDA), if any, will be used to repurchase the remaining outstanding BioCheck shares at one or more additional closings. There can be no assurance that BioCheck will generate any earnings in the next several years which would be sufficient to purchase additional shares of BioCheck pursuant to the stock purchase agreement. Even if BioCheck generates earnings, there can be no assurance that such earnings would be sufficient to complete our acquisition of the remaining 49% of BioCheck’s outstanding shares.

To avoid an increase in the purchase price of the remaining shares of BioCheck at the rate of 8% per annum, we would need to consummate a financing transaction to complete the acquisition of the remaining 49% of the outstanding shares of BioCheck. The successful completion of our acquisition of BioCheck in this manner is dependent upon obtaining financing on acceptable terms. No assurances can be given that we will be able to complete such a financing sufficient to undertake our acquisition of the outstanding shares of BioCheck on terms favorable to us, or at all. Any financing that we do undertake to finance the acquisition of BioCheck would likely involve dilution of our common stock if it is an equity financing, or will involve the assumption of significant debt by us.
 


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We will need additional financing in order to complete our development and commercialization programs.

As of December 31, 2006, we had an accumulated deficit of approximately $69,100,000. We currently do not have sufficient capital resources to complete the development and commercialization of our antioxidant therapeutic technologies and oxidative stress assays, and no assurances can be given that we will be able to raise such capital in the future on terms favorable to us, or at all. The lack of availability of additional capital could cause us to cease or curtail our operations and/or delay or prevent the development and marketing of our potential products. In addition, we may choose to abandon certain issued United States and international patents that we consider to be of lesser importance to our strategic direction, in an effort to preserve our financial resources.

Our future capital requirements will depend on many factors including the following:
 
 
 
·
 
continued scientific progress in our research and development programs and the commercialization of additional products;
 
 
 
·
 
the cost of our research and development and commercialization activities and arrangements, including sales and marketing;
 
 
 
·
 
the costs associated with the scale-up of manufacturing;
 
 
 
·
 
the success of pre-clinical and clinical trials;
 
 
 
·
 
the establishment of and changes in collaborative relationships;
 
 
 
·
 
the time and costs involved in filing, prosecuting, enforcing and defending patent claims;
 
 
 
·
 
the time and costs required for regulatory approvals;
 
 
 
·
 
the acquisition of additional technologies or businesses;
 
 
 
·
 
technological competition and market developments; and
 
 
 
·
 
the cost of complying with the requirements of the Autorité des Marchés Financiers, or AMF, the French regulatory agency overseeing the Nouveau Marché in France.

We will need to raise additional capital to fund our development and commercialization programs. Our current capital resources are not sufficient to sustain operations and our development program with respect to our Ergothioneine as a nutraceutical supplement. We have granted a licensee exclusive worldwide rights, in certain defined areas of cardiovascular indications, to develop, manufacture and market BXT-51072 and related compounds from our library of such antioxidant compounds. The licensee is responsible for worldwide product development programs with respect to the licensed compounds. Due to the lack of financial resources, we ceased further testing of BXT-51072 but continue to review the possibility of further developing applications for BXT-51072 and related compounds outside of the areas defined in the license. However, further development and commercialization of antioxidant therapeutic technologies, oxidative stress assays or currently unidentified opportunities, or the acquisition of additional technologies or businesses, may require additional capital. The fact that further development and commercialization of a product or technology would require us to raise additional capital, would be an important factor in our decision to engage in such further development or commercialization. No assurances can be given that we will be able to raise such funds in the future on terms favorable to us, or at all.
 

If we complete our acquisition of BioCheck, our business could be materially and adversely affected if we fail to adequately integrate the operations of the two companies.

If we complete the acquisition of BioCheck as planned, and we do not successfully integrate the operations of the two companies, or if the benefits of the transaction do not meet the expectations of financial or industry analysts, the market price of our common stock may decline. The acquisition could result in the use of significant amounts of cash, dilutive issuances of equity securities, or the incurrence of debt or expenses related to goodwill and other intangible assets, any of which, or all taken together, could materially adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.

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We may not be able to successfully integrate the BioCheck business into our existing business in a timely and non-disruptive manner, or at all. In addition, the acquisition may result in, among other things, substantial charges associated with acquired in-process research and development, future write-offs of goodwill that is deemed to be impaired, restructuring charges related to consolidation of operations, charges associated with unknown or unforeseen liabilities of acquired businesses and increased general and administrative expenses. Furthermore, the acquisition may not produce revenues, earnings or business synergies that we anticipate.   There can be no assurance that BioCheck will continue to manufacture our research assay test kits if that agreement is terminated.

In addition, in general, acquisitions such as these involve numerous risks, including:
 
 
 
·
 
difficulties in assimilating the operations, technologies, products and personnel of an acquired company;
 
 
 
·
 
risks of entering markets in which we have either no or limited prior experience;
 
 
 
·
 
diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns; and
 
 
 
·
 
potential loss of key employees of an acquired company.

The time, capital management and other resources spent on the acquisition, if it fails to meet our expectations, could cause our business and financial condition to be materially and adversely affected.

We may experience disruption or may fail to achieve any benefits in connection with the recent changes in executive management and in board membership.

During the second quarter of 2004, our former Chief Executive Officer retired, and during the third quarter of 2004 our Chief Operating and Financial Officer resigned from his position at our company. As a result, others who had limited experience within our senior management were appointed to serve as acting Chief Executive Officer, acting Chief Operating Officer and acting Chief Financial Officer. On February 28, 2005, the Board appointed Mr. Steven T. Guillen as our President and Chief Executive Officer, and as a member of our board. On January 6, 2006, we hired Michael D. Centron as our Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. On September 15, 2006, Mr. Guillen’s employment as President and Chief Executive Officer was terminated, and Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. was appointed our new President and Chief Executive Officer. On November 15, 2006 Michael Centron, our Vice President and Chief Financial Officer resigned. In addition, during 2004 and early 2005, following the acquisition of a then-majority interest in our company by Axonyx, eight directors resigned from our board resulting in a four-person board. During 2005 we added independent director John E. Repine, M.D., and Gary M. Post joined our board of directors on March 15, 2006, resulting in a six-person board. Timothy C. Rodell, M.D., declined to stand for re-election at the Annual Meeting of Stockholders held on August 1, 2006. On January 11, 2007, Matthew Spolar was appointed to our board of directors. All six directors currently serving on the board commenced their service on the board during the period of 2004 through the date hereof.
 

One impact of such changes has been to delay our sales promotions in the research assay market and in the development of Ergothioneine market opportunities. Further, we narrowed our strategic focus to concentrate resources, including discontinuing our Animal Health Profiling program. In addition, the decreased sales at our parent company level during 2006 are attributable to lower sales volume that was caused, in part, by the disruption arising from relocating our operations from Portland, Oregon to Foster City, California, the consolidation of our product offerings, and the lowering of sale prices for some of our products for competitive reasons. There can be no assurances that these changes will not cause further disruptions in, or otherwise adversely affect, our business and results of operations.


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If we fail to attract and retain key personnel, our business could suffer.

Our future depends, in part, on our ability to attract and retain key personnel. We may not be able to hire and retain such personnel at compensation levels consistent with our existing compensation and salary structure. We deferred the hiring of senior management personnel in order to allow our newly-engaged full time Chief Executive Officer to select such key personnel. We cannot predict whether we will be successful in finding suitable new candidates for our key management positions. On September 15, 2006, Mr. Guillen’s employment as President and Chief Executive Officer was terminated, and Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. was appointed our new President and Chief Executive Officer. On November 15, 2006, Michael Centron resigned as our Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Dr. Hausman has assumed the role of chief financial and accounting officer on an interim basis. While we have entered into an employment agreement with Dr. Hausman, he is free to terminate his employment “at will.” Further, we cannot predict whether Dr. Hausman will be successful in his role as our President and Chief Executive Officer, or whether senior management personnel hires will be effective. The loss of services of executive officers or key personnel, any transitional difficulties with our new Chief Executive Officer or the inability to attract qualified personnel could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and business. As we currently do not have a Chief Financial Officer, it is crucial that we find a qualified individual to fill that role and to oversee and certify the periodic reports we must file with the Securities and Exchange Commission. As we currently have limited cash resources, if any of our key personnel leaves, replacing them will be difficult. We do not have any key employee life insurance policies with respect to any of our executive officers.

The success of our business depends upon our ability to successfully develop and commercialize products.

We cannot assure you that our efforts to develop and commercialize a cardiac predictor product, an Ergothioneine nutraceutical product or any other products will be successful. The cost of such development and commercialization efforts can be significant and the likelihood of success of any such programs is difficult to predict. The failure to develop or commercialize such new products could be materially harmful to us and our financial condition.
 

Our future profitability is uncertain.

We cannot predict our ability to increase our revenues or achieve profitability. We may be required to increase our research and development expenses in order to develop potential new products. As evidenced by the substantial net losses during and 2006 and 2005, losses and expenses may increase and fluctuate from quarter to quarter. There can be no assurance that we will ever achieve profitable operations.

Our ability to successfully develop and commercialize our nutraceutical or clinical diagnostic product candidates, and make them available for sale, is uncertain.

All of our nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates are at an early stage of development and all of such nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates will require expensive and lengthy testing and regulatory clearances. None of our nutracutical or clinical diagnostic candidates have been approved by regulatory authorities. We may not be able to make many of our product candidates commercially available for several years, if at all. There are many reasons we may fail in our efforts to develop our nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates, including:
 

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·
 
our nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates may be ineffective, toxic or may not receive regulatory clearances,
 
 
 
·
 
our nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates may be too expensive to manufacture or market or may not achieve broad market acceptance,
 
 
 
·
 
third parties may hold proprietary rights that may preclude us from developing or marketing our nutraceutical and clinical diagnostic candidates, or
 
 
 
·
 
third parties may market equivalent or superior products.

Clinical development is inherently uncertain and expense levels may fluctuate unexpectedly because we cannot accurately predict the timing and level of such expenses.

Our future success may depend in part upon the results of clinical trials undertaken by us or our licensees designed to assess the safety and efficacy of our potential products. We do not have substantial experience in developing and running clinical trials. The completion of clinical trials often depends significantly upon the rate of patient enrollment, and our expense levels will vary depending upon the rate of enrollment. In addition, the length of time necessary to complete clinical trials and submit an application for marketing and manufacturing approvals varies significantly and is difficult to predict. The expenses associated with each phase of development depend upon the design of the trial. The design of each phase of trials depends in part upon results of prior phases, and additional trials may be needed at each phase. As a result, the expense associated with future phases cannot be predicted in advance. Further, if we undertake clinical trials, we may decide to terminate or suspend ongoing trials. Failure to comply with extensive FDA regulations may result in unanticipated delay, suspension or cancellation of a trial or the FDA’s refusal to accept test results. The FDA may also suspend our clinical trials at any time if it concludes that the participants are being exposed to unacceptable risks. As a result of these factors, we cannot predict the actual expenses that we will incur with respect to clinical trials for any of our potential products, and we expect that our expense levels will fluctuate unexpectedly in the future.

Competition in most of our primary current and potential market areas is intense and expected to increase.

The diagnostic, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries are highly competitive. The main commercial competition at present in our research assay business is represented by, but not limited to, the following companies: Cayman Chemical Company, Assay Designs and Randox Laboratories Ltd. In addition, our competitors and potential competitors include large pharmaceutical/nutraceutical companies, universities and research institutions. Compared to us, these competitors may have substantially greater capital resources, research and development staffs, facilities, as well as greater expertise manufacturing and making products. In addition, these companies, as well as others, may have or may develop new technologies or use existing technologies that are, or may in the future be, the basis for competitive products. There can be no assurance that we can compete successfully.
In addition, current and potential competitors may make strategic acquisitions or establish cooperative relationships among themselves or with third parties, thereby increasing the ability of their products to address the needs of our current and prospective customers. Accordingly, it is possible that new competitors or alliances among current and new competitors may emerge and rapidly gain significant market share. Such competition could materially adversely affect our ability to commercialize existing technologies or new technologies on terms favorable to us. Further, competitive pressures could require us to reduce the price of our products and technologies, which could materially adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition. We may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors and any failure to do so would have a material adverse effect upon our business, operating results and financial condition.


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TorreyPines Therapeutics, Inc. holds significant stockholder voting power, and may be in a position to influence matters affecting us.

TorreyPines Therapeutics, Inc. or TorreyPines, which merged with Axonyx Inc. in October 2006, currently owns approximately 32% of our issued and outstanding stock. In addition, Dr. Marvin Hausman is a member of the board of directors of TorreyPines and is our President and Chief Executive Officer and the chairman of our board of directors. Given these circumstances, TorreyPines may influence our business direction and policies, and, thus, may have the ability to control certain material decisions affecting us. In addition, such concentration of voting power could have the effect of delaying, deterring or preventing a change of control or other business combination that might otherwise be beneficial to our stockholders. Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law prohibits a Delaware corporation from engaging in any business combination with any interested stockholder for a period of three years unless the transaction meets certain conditions. Section 203 also limits the extent to which an interested stockholder can receive benefits from our assets. These provisions could complicate or prohibit certain transactions (including a financing transaction between us and TorreyPines), or limit the price that other investors might be willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock.

If we are unable to develop and maintain alliances with collaborative partners, we may have difficulty developing and selling our products and services.

Our ability to realize significant revenues from new products and technologies is dependent upon, among other things, our success in developing business alliances and licensing arrangements with nutraceutical, biopharmaceutical and/or health related companies to develop and market these products. To date, we have had limited success in establishing foundations for such business alliances and licensing arrangements and there can be no assurance that our efforts will result in the development of mature relationships or that any such relationships will be successful. Further, relying on these or other alliances is risky to our future success because:
 
 
 
·
 
our partners may develop products or technologies competitive with our products and technologies;
 
 
 
·
 
our partners may not devote sufficient resources to the development and sale of our products and technologies;
 
 
 
·
 
our collaborations may be unsuccessful; or
 
 
 
·
 
we may not be able to negotiate future alliances on acceptable terms.

Our revenues and quarterly results have fluctuated historically and may continue to fluctuate, which could cause our stock price to decrease.

Our revenues and operating results may fluctuate due in part to factors that are beyond our control and which we cannot predict. Material shortfalls in revenues will materially adversely affect our results and may cause us to experience losses. In particular, our revenue growth and profitability depend on sales of our research assays and fine chemicals. Factors that could cause sales for these products and other products to fluctuate include:
 
 
 
·
 
an inability to produce products in sufficient quantities and with appropriate quality;
 
 
 
·
 
an inability to obtain sufficient raw materials;
 
 
 
·
 
the loss of or reduction in orders from key customers;
 
 
 
·
 
variable or decreased demand from our customers;
 
 
 
·
 
the receipt of relatively large orders with short lead times;

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·
 
our customers’ expectations as to how long it takes us to fill future orders;
 
 
 
·
 
customers’ budgetary constraints and internal acceptance review procedures;
 
 
 
·
 
there may be only a limited number of customers that are willing to purchase our research assays and fine chemicals;
 
 
 
·
 
a long sales cycle that involves substantial human and capital resources; and
 
 
 
·
 
potential downturns in general or in industry specific economic conditions.

Each of these factors has impacted, and may in the future impact, the demand for and availability of our products and our quarterly operating results. For example, due to the unavailability of beef liver as a source for bSOD we were unable to sell any bSOD during 2006, 2005 and 2004, as compared to sales of $562,000 in 2003. We do not anticipate this source becoming available again within the foreseeable future and do not anticipate any revenues from sales of this product in the foreseeable future. In addition, a decrease in the demand for our Ergothioneine product resulted in a reduction of sales of Ergothioneine to $1,000 in 2006, $18,000 in 2005 and $87,000 in 2004, compared to $333,000 in 2003. We cannot predict with any certainty our future sales of Ergothioneine.

If the sales or development cycles for research assays and fine chemicals lengthen unexpectedly, our revenues may decline or not grow as anticipated and our results from operations may be harmed.
 
Changes in accounting standards regarding stock option plans could increase our reported losses, cause our stock price to decline and limit the desirability of granting stock options.

In December 2004, the FASB issued SFAS 123R. SFAS 123R replaces SFAS No. 123 and supersedes APB Opinion No. 25. SFAS 123R establishes standards for the accounting for share-based payment transactions in which an entity exchanges its equity instruments for goods or services. It also addresses transactions in which an entity incurs liabilities in exchange for goods or services that are based on the fair value of the entity’s equity instruments or that may be settled by the issuance of those equity instruments. SFAS 123R covers a wide range of share-based compensation arrangements including share options, restricted share plans, performance-based awards, share appreciation rights and employee share purchase plans. SFAS 123R requires a public entity to measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award on the grant date (with limited exceptions). That cost will be recognized in the entity’s financial statements over the period during which the employee is required to provide services in exchange for the award. Management implemented SFAS 123R effective January 1, 2006. Expensing such stock options will add to our losses or reduce our profits, if any. In addition, stock options are an important employee recruitment and retention tool, and we may not be able to attract and retain key personnel if we reduce the scope of our employee stock option program.

Our income may suffer if we receive relatively large orders with short lead times, or our manufacturing capacity does not otherwise match our demand.

Because we cannot immediately adapt our production capacity and related cost structures to rapidly changing market conditions, when demand does not meet our expectations, our manufacturing capacity will likely exceed our production requirements. Fixed costs associated with excess manufacturing capacity could adversely affect our income. Similarly, if we receive relatively large orders with short lead times, we may not be able to increase our manufacturing capacity to meet product demand, and, accordingly, we will not be able to fulfill orders in a timely manner. During a market upturn, we may not be able to purchase sufficient supplies to meet increasing product demand. In addition, suppliers may extend lead times, limit supplies or increase prices due to capacity constraints or other factors. These factors could materially and adversely affect our results.


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Our success will require that we establish a strong intellectual property position and that we can defend ourselves against intellectual property claims from others.

Maintaining a strong patent position is important to us in order to establish and maintain a competitive advantage. We currently have 81 patents either granted or applied for in 16 countries with expiration dates ranging from 2009 to 2025. Litigation on patent-related matters has been prevalent in our industry and we expect that this will continue. Patent law relating to the scope of claims in the technology fields in which we operate is still evolving and the extent of future protection is highly uncertain, so there can be no assurance that the patent rights we have or may obtain will be valuable. Others may have filed, or may in the future file, patent applications that are similar or identical to ours. To determine the priority of inventions, we may have to participate in interference proceedings declared by the United States Patent and Trademark Office that could result in substantial costs in legal fees and could substantially affect the scope of our patent protection. We cannot assure investors that any such patent applications will not have priority over our patent applications. Further, we may choose to abandon certain issued United States and international patents that we consider to be of lesser importance to our strategic direction, in an effort to preserve our financial resources. Abandonment of patents could substantially affect the scope of our patent protection. In addition, we may in future periods incur substantial costs in litigation to defend against patent suits brought by third parties or if we initiate such suits.

In addition to patent protection, we also rely upon trade secret protection for our confidential and proprietary information. There can be no assurance, however, that such measures will provide adequate protection for our trade secrets or other proprietary information. In addition, there can be no assurance that trade secrets and other proprietary information will not be disclosed, that others will not independently develop substantially equivalent proprietary information and techniques or otherwise gain access to or disclose our trade secrets and other proprietary information. If we cannot obtain, maintain or enforce our intellectual property rights, competitors may seize the opportunity to design and commercialize competing technologies.

We may face challenges from third parties regarding the validity of our patents and proprietary rights, or from third parties asserting that we are infringing their patents or proprietary rights, which could result in litigation that would be costly to defend and could deprive us of valuable rights.

Extensive litigation regarding patents and other intellectual property rights has been common in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. The defense and prosecution of intellectual property suits, United States Patent and Trademark Office interference proceedings, and related legal and administrative proceedings in the United States and internationally involve complex legal and factual questions. As a result, such proceedings are costly and time-consuming to pursue and their outcome is uncertain. Litigation may be necessary to:
 
 
 
·
 
enforce patents that we own or license;
 
 
 
·
 
protect trade secrets or know-how that we own or license; or
 
 
 
·
 
determine the enforceability, scope and validity of the proprietary rights of others.

Our involvement in any litigation, interference or other administrative proceedings could cause us to incur substantial expense and could significantly divert the efforts of our technical and management personnel. An adverse determination may subject us to loss of our proprietary position or to significant liabilities, or require us to seek licenses that may not be available from third parties. An adverse determination in a judicial or administrative proceeding, or a failure to obtain necessary licenses, may restrict or prevent us from manufacturing and selling our products. Costs associated with these arrangements may be substantial and may include ongoing royalties. Furthermore, we may not be able to obtain the necessary licenses on satisfactory terms, if at all. These outcomes could materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.


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We may be exposed to liability due to product defects.

The risk of product liability claims is inherent in the testing, manufacturing, marketing and sale of our products. We may seek to acquire additional insurance for liability risks. We may not be able to obtain such insurance or general product liability insurance on acceptable terms or in sufficient amounts. A product liability claim or recall could have a serious adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Disclosure controls are no assurance that the objectives of the control system are met.

Although we have an extensive operating history, resources are limited for the development and maintenance of our control environment. We have a very limited number of personnel and therefore segregation of duties can be somewhat limited as to their scope and effectiveness. We believe, however, that we are in reasonable compliance with the best practices given the environment in which we operate. Although existing controls in place are deemed appropriate for the prevention, detection and minimization of fraud, theft and errors, they may result in only limited assurances, at best, that the total objectives of the control system are met. Due to the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, can be detected and/or prevented and as such this is a risk area for investors to consider.
 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock
 
Our common stock is traded on the OTCBB, our stock price is highly volatile, and you may not be able to sell your shares of our common stock at a price greater than or equal to the price you paid for such shares.

Our shares of common stock are currently traded on the Over the Counter Bulletin Board, or OTCBB. Stocks traded on the OTCBB generally have limited trading volume and exhibit a wide spread between bid and ask quotations. The market price of our common stock is extremely volatile. To demonstrate the volatility of our stock price, during 2006, the volume of our common stock traded on any given day ranged from 0 to 2,786,900 shares. Moreover, during that period, our common stock traded as low as $0.18 per share and as high as $0.44 per share, a 144% difference. This may impact an investor’s decision to buy or sell our common stock. As of December 31, 2006 there were approximately 5,200 holders of our common stock. Factors affecting our stock price include:
 
 
 
·
 
our financial results;
 
 
 
·
 
fluctuations in our operating results;
 
 
 
·
 
announcements of technological innovations or new commercial health care products or therapeutic products by us or our competitors;
 
 
 
·
 
government regulation;
 
 
 
·
 
developments in patents or other intellectual property rights;
 
 
 
·
 
developments in our relationships with customers and potential customers; and
 
 
 
·
 
general market conditions.

Furthermore, volatility in the stock price of other companies has often led to securities class action litigation against those companies. Any such securities litigation against us could result in substantial costs and divert management’s attention and resources, which could seriously harm our business and financial condition.


50


Our common stock may be subject to “penny stock” rules which may be detrimental to investors.

Our common stock may be, or may become, subject to the regulations promulgated by the SEC for “penny stock.” SEC regulation relating to penny stock is presently evolving, and the OTCBB may react to such evolving regulation in a way that adversely affects the market liquidity of our common stock. Penny stock currently includes any non-NASDAQ equity security that has a market price of less than $5.00 per share, subject to certain exceptions. The regulations require that prior to any non-exempt buy/sell transaction in a penny stock, a disclosure schedule set forth by the SEC relating to the penny stock market must be delivered to the purchaser of such penny stock. This disclosure must include the amount of commissions payable to both the broker-dealer and the registered representative and current price quotations for the common stock. The regulations also require that monthly statements be sent to holders of penny stock that disclose recent price information for the penny stock and information of the limited market for penny stocks. These requirements may adversely affect the market liquidity of our common stock.


Sales of our common stock may require broker-dealers to make special suitability determinations regarding prospective purchasers.

Our common stock may be, or may become, subject to Rule 15g-1 through 15g-9 under the Exchange Act, which imposes certain sales practice requirements on broker-dealers which sell our common stock to persons other than established customers and “accredited investors” (generally, individuals with a net worth in excess of $1,000,000 or an annual income exceeding $200,000 (or $300,000 together with their spouses)). For transactions covered by this rule, a broker-dealer must make a special suitability determination for the purchaser and have received the purchaser’s written consent to the transaction prior to the sale. Applicability of this rule would adversely affect the ability of broker-dealers to sell our common stock and purchasers of our common stock to sell their shares of such common stock. Accordingly, the market for our common stock may be limited and the value negatively impacted.

We will incur expenses in connection with registration of our shares which may be significant.

We are required to pay fees and expenses incident to the registration with the SEC of the shares issued in the private placements of equity which closed on January 6, 2005 and October 25, 2006 and maintain adequate disclosure in connection with such registration, including updating prospectuses and under certain circumstances, filing amended registration statements. These expenses were approximately $302,000 in 2006, and we may incur significant additional expenses in the future related to maintaining effective registration statements for prior financings and any additional registrations related to future financings. We have also agreed to indemnify such selling security holders against losses, claims, damages and liabilities arising out of relating to any misstatements or omissions in our registration statement and related prospectuses, including liabilities under the Securities Act. In the event such a claim is made in the future, such losses, claims, damages and liabilities arising therefrom could be significant in relation to our revenues.

A large number of additional shares may be sold into the public market in the near future, which may cause the market price of our common stock to decline significantly, even if our business is successful.

Sales of a substantial amount of common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales may occur, could adversely affect the market price of our common stock. After our October 25, 2006 debenture and warrant financing, and assuming the full conversion of the debentures and full exercise of the Series A, B, C, D and E warrants for the maximum number of shares for which such warrants are exercisable, we would have approximately 64 million shares of common stock outstanding (assuming no other issuances of common stock). Upon full issuance of these shares of common stock upon conversion of the debentures and exercise of the warrants, the market price of our common stock could drop significantly if the holders of these shares sell them or are perceived by the market as intending to sell them.
 

51


A large number of common shares are issuable upon exercise of outstanding common share options and warrants and upon conversion of our outstanding debentures. The exercise or conversion of these securities could result in the substantial dilution of your investment in terms of your percentage ownership in OXIS as well as the book value of your common shares. The sale of a large amount of common shares received upon exercise of these options and warrants on the public market to finance the exercise price or to pay associated income taxes, or the perception that such sales could occur, could substantially depress the prevailing market prices for our shares.

As of December 31, 2006, there are outstanding warrants entitling the holders to purchase up to a maximum of 9,681,840 common shares at an exercise price of $0.35 per share. In addition, there are outstanding warrants entitling the holders to purchase up to a maximum of 4,840,740 common shares at an exercise price of $0.385 per share. There are also debentures outstanding which are convertible into a maximum of 4,840,740 common shares at a conversion price per common share of $0.35 per common share. Further, we have relied heavily on option and warrant grants as an alternative to cash as a means of compensating our officers, advisors and consultants. In 2006, we issued options and warrants to officers, director and consultants for the purchase of approximately 4.4 million shares of our common stock, with exercise prices ranging from $0.18 to $0.39 per share. The exercise price for all of the aforesaid options and warrants may be less than your cost to acquire our common shares. In the event of the exercise and/or conversion of these securities, you could suffer substantial dilution of your investment in terms of your percentage ownership in the company as well as the book value of your common shares. In addition, the holders of the options and warrants may sell underlying common shares in tandem with their exercise of those warrants to finance that exercise, or may resell the shares purchased in order to cover any income tax liabilities that may arise from their exercise of the options and warrants.
 

If we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal controls, our ability to provide accurate financial statements and comply with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 could be impaired, which could cause our stock price to decrease substantially.

We are continuing to take measures to address and improve our financial reporting and compliance capabilities and we are in the process of instituting changes to satisfy our obligations in connection with being a public company. We plan to obtain additional financial and accounting resources to support and enhance our ability to meet the requirements of being a public company. We will need to continue to improve our financial and managerial controls, reporting systems and procedures, and documentation thereof. If our financial and managerial controls, reporting systems or procedures fail, we may not be able to provide accurate financial statements on a timely basis or comply with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 as it applies to us. Any failure of our internal controls or our ability to provide accurate financial statements could cause the trading price of our common stock to decrease substantially.

Our common shares are thinly traded and, if you are a holder of debentures, you may be unable to sell at or near ask prices or at all if you need to convert your debentures into common stock and sell your shares to raise money or otherwise desire to liquidate such shares.

We cannot predict the extent to which an active public market for our common stock will develop or be sustained. Our common shares have historically been sporadically or “thinly-traded” on the “Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board,” meaning that the number of persons interested in purchasing our common shares at or near bid prices at any given time may be relatively small or non-existent. This situation is attributable to a number of factors, including the fact that we are a small company which is relatively unknown to stock analysts, stock brokers, institutional investors and others in the investment community that generate or influence sales volume, and that even if we came to the attention of such persons, they tend to be risk-averse and would be reluctant to follow an unproven company such as ours or purchase or recommend the purchase of our shares until such time as we became more seasoned and viable. As a consequence, there may be periods of several days or more when trading activity in our shares is minimal or non-existent, as compared to a seasoned issuer which has a large and steady volume of trading activity that will generally support continuous sales without an adverse effect on share price. We cannot give you any assurance that a broader or more active public trading market for our common stock will develop or be sustained, or that current trading levels will be sustained.


52


The market price for our common stock is particularly volatile given our status as a relatively small company with a small and thinly traded “float” and lack of current revenues that could lead to wide fluctuations in our share price. The price at which you convert your debentures into our common stock many be indicative of the price that will prevail in the trading market. You may be unable to sell your common stock at or above your purchase price if at all, which may result in substantial losses to you.

The market for our common shares is characterized by significant price volatility when compared to seasoned issuers, and we expect that our share price will continue to be more volatile than a seasoned issuer for the indefinite future. The volatility in our share price is attributable to a number of factors. First, as noted above, our common shares are sporadically and/or thinly traded. As a consequence of this lack of liquidity, the trading of relatively small quantities of shares by its shareholders may disproportionately influence the price of those shares in either direction. The price for its shares could, for example, decline precipitously in the event that a large number of our common shares are sold on the market without commensurate demand, as compared to a seasoned issuer which could better absorb those sales without adverse impact on its share price. Secondly, an investment in us is a speculative or “risky” investment due to our lack of revenues or profits to date and uncertainty of future market acceptance for current and potential products. As a consequence of this enhanced risk, more risk-adverse investors may, under the fear of losing all or most of their investment in the event of negative news or lack of progress, be more inclined to sell their shares on the market more quickly and at greater discounts than would be the case with the stock of a seasoned issuer.
 

Investors should be aware that, according to SEC Release No. 34-29093, the market for penny stocks has suffered in recent years from patterns of fraud and abuse. Such patterns include (1) control of the market for the security by one or a few broker-dealers that are often related to the promoter or issuer; (2) manipulation of prices through prearranged matching of purchases and sales and false and misleading press releases; (3) boiler room practices involving high-pressure sales tactics and unrealistic price projections by inexperienced sales persons; (4) excessive and undisclosed bid-ask differential and markups by selling broker-dealers; and (5) the wholesale dumping of the same securities by promoters and broker-dealers after prices have been manipulated to a desired level, along with the resulting inevitable collapse of those prices and with consequent investor losses. Our management is aware of the abuses that have occurred historically in the penny stock market. Although we do not expect to be in a position to dictate the behavior of the market or of broker-dealers who participate in the market, management will strive within the confines of practical limitations to prevent the described patterns from being established with respect to our securities. The occurrence of these patterns or practices could increase the volatility of our share price.

We do not anticipate paying any cash dividends.

We presently do not anticipate that we will pay any dividends on any of our capital stock in the foreseeable future. The payment of dividends, if any, would be contingent upon our revenues and earnings, if any, capital requirements, and general financial condition. The payment of any dividends will be within the discretion of our board of directors. We presently intend to retain all earnings, if any, to implement our business plan; accordingly, we do not anticipate the declaration of any dividends in the foreseeable future.
 

ITEM 7. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

The Audited Financial Statements for this Form 10-KSB appear on pages F-1 through F-34 following the signature page below.


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ITEM 8. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE.

None.

ITEM 8A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during our most recent fiscal year that has materially affected or is reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

ITEM 8B. OTHER INFORMATION

None.

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PART III

ITEM 9. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS, PROMOTERS AND CONTROL PERSONS; COMPLIANCE WITH SECTION 16(a) OF THE EXCHANGE ACT 

 The following table sets forth certain information with respect to each of our directors and executive officers as of March 23, 2007.
 
 
Name
 
 
Age
 
 
Principal Occupation
 
Served as
Director Since
Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. (2)
 
65
 
President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board
 
2004
Steven T. Guillen (4)
 
55
 
Director
 
2005
S. Colin Neill (1) (3)
 
60
 
Secretary, Director
 
2004
John E. Repine, M.D. (1)
 
62
 
Director
 
2005
Gary M. Post (1)
 
58
 
Director
 
2006
Matthew Spolar
 
33
 
Director
 
2007

 
 
(1)
 
Member of the Audit Committee.
 
(2)
 
Appointed President and Chief Executive Officer on September 15, 2006. Member of the Compensation Committee. In addition, on November 15, 2006, following the resignation of Michael Centron as our Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Dr. Hausman has assumed the role of chief financial and accounting officer on an interim basis.
 
(3)
 
Member of the Nominating Committee.
 
(4)
 
Terminated as President and Chief Executive Officer on September 15, 2006.  Resigned from the board of directors on April 12, 2007.

Marvin S. Hausman, M.D., President, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board. Dr. Hausman was appointed to the board of directors on August 20, 2004. Previously, Dr. Hausman served on the board of directors from March 2002 to November 2003. On December 10, 2004, the board of directors appointed Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. to serve as Chairman of the Board, Acting Chief Executive Officer and Acting Chief Financial Officer of OXIS. On February 28, 2005, Dr. Hausman ceased to be the Company’s Chief Executive Officer. On September 15, 2006, Dr. Hausman was appointed to serve as President and Chief Executive Officer by the board of directors. Dr. Hausman served as a director and as Chairman of the Board of Axonyx from 1997 until the merger of Axonyx into TorreyPines Therapeutics in October 2006, and had served as President and Chief Executive Officer of Axonyx from 1997 until September 2003 and March 2005, respectively. Dr. Hausman is currently a member of the board of directors of TorreyPines Therapeutics. Dr. Hausman served as our Acting Chief Financial Officer until January 6, 2006 when Michael D. Centron was appointed as our Chief Financial Officer. Dr. Hausman currently owns approximately 2.8% of the outstanding common stock of OXIS, and Torrey Pines Therapeutics currently owns approximately 33% of the outstanding common stock of OXIS. Dr. Hausman was a co-founder of Medco Research Inc., a pharmaceutical biotechnology company specializing in adenosine products which was subsequently acquired by King Pharmaceuticals. He has thirty years’ experience in drug development and clinical care. Dr. Hausman received his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine in 1967 and has done residencies in General Surgery at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, and in Urological Surgery at U.C.L.A. Medical Center in Los Angeles. He also worked as a Research Associate at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. He has been a Lecturer, Clinical Instructor and Attending Surgeon at the U.C.L.A. Medical Center Division of Urology and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. He has been a Consultant on Clinical/Pharmaceutical Research to various pharmaceutical companies, including Bristol-Meyers International, Mead-Johnson Pharmaceutical Company, Medco Research, Inc., and E.R. Squibb.

55


Since October 1995, Dr. Hausman has been the President of Northwest Medical Research Partners, Inc., a medical technology and transfer company. He was a member of the board of directors of Medco Research, Inc. from inception (1978) through 1992 and from May 1996 to July 1998. Dr. Hausman was a member of the board of directors of Regent Assisted Living, Inc., a company specializing in building assisted living centers including care of senile dementia residents, from March 1996 to April 2001.

Steven T. Guillen, Director. On February 28, 2005, Steven T. Guillen was appointed the Company’s President, Chief Executive Officer and a member of our board of directors. Mr. Guillen’s employment was terminated by the board of directors on September 15, 2006.  Mr. Guillen resigned from the board of directors on April 12, 2007.  Prior to joining the Company, from 2001 to 2004, Mr. Guillen served as Vice President, Sales and Marketing for Amarin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a neuroscience company focused on the development and commercialization of drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders affecting the central nervous system. From 1996 to 2001, Mr. Guillen served as the Vice President, Sales and Marketing for Athena Diagnostics, a company involved with the development and commercialization of diagnostic testing for neurological diseases. From 1991 until joining Amarin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Mr. Guillen held several senior level sales and marketing positions with Elan Pharmaceuticals, an affiliate of Elan Corporation, PLC, including from 1996 to 2001 as Vice President of Sales and Marketing for Athena Diagnostics (Division of Elan), a reference laboratory dedicated to the development and commercialization of diagnostic testing for neurological disorders. Prior to joining Elan Pharmaceuticals, Mr. Guillen spent 17 years at Merck & Co., Inc., where he held a number of positions of increasing responsibility, including responsibility for the training and development of a 350 member sales management team. Mr. Guillen holds a B.S. in Zoology, with a minor in Chemistry, from the University of California, Davis, and MBA from the University of California, Riverside.
 
S. Colin Neill, Secretary and Director. Mr. Neill was appointed to the board of directors in April 2004. He has served as Secretary of OXIS since January 2005. Mr. Neill has been the Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Pharmos Corporation since October 2006. Mr. Neill joined Axonyx in September 2003 as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer and served in that capacity until October 2006 when Axonyx was acquired by TorreyPines Therapeutics. From April 2001 to September 2003, Mr. Neill had been an independent consultant assisting small development stage companies raise capital. Previously, Mr. Neill served as Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Treasurer of ClinTrials Research Inc., a publicly traded global contract research organization in the drug development business, from 1998 until its sale in April 2001. Prior to that, Mr. Neill served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Continental Health Affiliates Inc. and its majority owned subsidiary Infu-Tech Inc. Mr. Neill’s experience has included that of Acting Vice President Finance and Chief Financial Officer of Pharmos Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company in the business of developing novel drug technologies. Earlier experience was gained as Vice President Finance and Chief Financial Officer of BTR Inc., a U.S. subsidiary of BTR plc, a British diversified manufacturing company, and Vice President Financial Services of The BOC Group Inc., a British owned industrial gas company with substantial operations in the health care field. Mr. Neill served for four years with American Express Travel Related Services, first as chief internal auditor for worldwide operations and then as head of business planning and financial analysis. Mr. Neill began his career in public accounting with Arthur Andersen LLP in Ireland and later with Price Waterhouse LLP as a senior manager in New York City. He also served with Price Waterhouse for two years in Paris, France. Mr. Neill graduated from Trinity College, Dublin with a first class honors degree in Business/Economics and he holds a masters degree in Accounting and Finance from the London School of Economics. He is a Certified Public Accountant in New York State and a Chartered Accountant in Ireland.


56


Gary M. Post, Director. Mr. Post has served as a director of OXIS since March 15, 2006 and currently, though an advisory agreement, serves part-time as Acting Chief Operating Officer of the Company. Since 1999 Mr. Post has been the Managing Director and Investment Principal of Ambient Advisors, LLC. Ambient Advisors primarily invests its own and its partners’ capital in private and public companies with a particular interest in the health care and life sciences sector and certain other special situations. Ambient Advisors also actively advises these companies, sometimes taking interim management roles. In his capacity as Managing Director at Ambient Advisors, Mr. Post has acted as an interim Chief Executive Officer in two private early to mid stage companies that Ambient had invested in, Opticon Medical, Inc., a medical device company and OccMeds Billing Services, Inc., a worker’s compensation pharmacy payment processing company. Mr. Post also served as a President and CEO of VoIP, Inc., a leading provider of Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) communications solutions for service providers, resellers and consumers during 2006 and continues as a member of the VoIP, Inc. Board of Directors. Mr. Post holds a MBA from the U.C.L.A. Graduate School of Management and an A.B. in Economics from Stanford University.

John E. Repine, M.D., Director. Dr. Repine has served as a director of OXIS since October 2005. Since 1996, Dr. Repine has been the James J. Waring Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Since 1993, Dr. Repine has been the Chief Executive Officer and President of the Webb-Waring Institute for Cancer, Aging and Antioxidant Research.   Dr. Repine graduated from the School of Medicine and completed training in internal medicine and pulmonary medicine at the University of Minnesota.  Dr. Repine has received many national awards for his research including an Established Investigator Award from the American Heart Association, the Alton Ochsner Award Relating Smoking and Health and the Senior Scholar in Aging Award from the Ellison Medical Foundation. Dr. Repine was the Principal Investigator for 10 years for one of six National Specialized Centers of Research (SCOR) of the National Institutes of Health for the Study of Acute Lung Injury.  Dr. Repine is a recognized expert in the study of vascular disorders, inflammation, oxidants and antioxidants.  Dr. Repine has served in various capacities with a number of biotechnology companies.

Matthew Spolar, Director. Mr. Spolar has served as a director of OXIS since January 2007, and currently serves as Vice President, Product Technology for Atkins Nutritionals, Inc., a market-leading portable nutrition foods company. Since 1999, Mr. Spolar has spearheaded new product development, product optimization, scientific affairs, quality systems management, and technical production support for Atkins. Mr. Spolar helped to arrange an acquisition of Atkins by Parthenon Capital and Goldman Sachs in October, 2003 for more than $500 million, participated in improving the company's balance sheet through a pre-packaged bankruptcy where two-thirds of liabilities were exchanged for equity, and witnessed the company's emergence from bankruptcy just six months later. Prior to joining Atkins, Mr. Spolar served as an analyst with Datamonitor, Inc., a global management consultancy, where he specialized in providing information solutions for Fortune 500 consumer packaged goods companies. Mr. Spolar was awarded BS and MS degrees in Food Science from the Pennsylvania State University.

There are no family relationships between the officer and directors.

On March 8, 2007, we and Mr. Guillen entered into a Confidential Separation Agreement (dated February 12, 2007), under which we agreed to pay Mr. Guillen the sum of $250,000 in twelve equal monthly installments, subject to standard payroll deductions and withholdings. We also agreed that Mr. Guillen’s stock options would immediately vest, and that to the extent the shares underlying such options are not registered, Mr. Guillen would be granted piggyback registration rights to cover these shares. Mr. Guillen would have the right to exercise his options until September of 2009. We also agreed to pay Mr. Guillen’s health insurance premiums for the twelve-month separation period in accordance with the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985. In exchange for these payments and benefits, Mr. Guillen and OXIS agreed to mutually release all claims, dismiss all complaints as applicable, and neither party shall pursue any future claims regarding Mr. Guillen’s prior employment and compensation arrangements with us. A copy of the separation agreement is included as Exhibit 10.43 to this annual report on Form 10-KSB.


57


None of our directors, officers or affiliates, and no owner of record or beneficial owner of more than five percent (5%) of our securities, or any associate of any such director, officer or security holder is a party adverse to OXIS or any of its subsidiaries or has a material interest adverse to OXIS or any of its subsidiaries in reference to pending litigation.

Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance

No director, officer or beneficial owner of more than 10% of any class of our equity securities failed to file a Form 3 or Form 4 on a timely basis in 2006, except that a Form 4 was inadvertently filed late on May 23, 2006 with respect to an option grant to Gary Post.

Code of Ethics

The Board of Directors has adopted a Code of Ethics and Business Conduct to provide guidance to its directors, officers and employees regarding standards for conduct of the Company’s business, which code has been delivered to all directors, officers and employees of the Company. The full text of our Code of Ethics and Business Conduct is available on our website at www.oxis.com.  To the extent required by law, any amendments to, or waivers from, any provision of the code of ethics will promptly be disclosed to the public. To the extent permitted by such legal requirements, we intend to make such public disclosure by posting the relevant material on our website in accordance with SEC rules.

Audit Committee and Audit Committee Financial Expert
 
We are not a “listed company” under SEC rules and are therefore not required to have an audit committee comprised of independent directors. We do, however, have an audit committee consisting of three members of our board of directors, including S. Colin Neill, John E. Repine, M.D., and Gary M. Post. The board of directors has determined that S. Colin Neill, the Chairman of our Audit Committee, qualifies as an “audit committee financial expert” as defined by the rules of the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, the board of directors has determined that each of the members of the audit committee is able to read and understand fundamental financial statements and has substantial business experience that results in that member's financial sophistication. Accordingly, the board of directors believes that each member of the audit committee has sufficient knowledge and experience necessary to fulfill such member’s duties and obligations as an audit committee member.
 
ITEM 10. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
Our compensation and benefits program is designed to attract, retain and motivate employees to operate and manage the Company for the best interests of its constituents. Executive compensation is designed to provide incentives for those senior members of management who bear responsibility for our goals and achievements. The compensation philosophy is based on a base salary, bonuses and a stock option program.
 

The following table sets forth compensation information for services rendered to us by certain executive officers (collectively, the Company’s “Named Executive Officers”) in all capacities, other than as directors, during each of the prior three fiscal years. Other than as set forth below, no executive officer’s salary and bonus exceeded $100,000 in any of the applicable years. The following information includes the dollar value of base salaries, bonus awards, the number of stock options granted and certain other compensation, if any, whether paid or deferred. Shares issued in lieu of compensation are listed in the year the salary was due.

58


SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name and Principal Position
 
Year
 
Salary
 
 
 
Bonus
 
Stock Awards
 
 
 
Option/
Warrant Awards (4)
 
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan Compen-sation
 
All Other Compensation
 
 
 
Total
 
Steven T. Guillen (1)
   
2006
 
$
190,000
           
$
 
$
     
$
68,772
 
$
 
$
29,417
   
(2
)
$
288,189
 
Former President, Chief Executive
   
2005
 
$
209,000
           
$
 
$
     
$
111,510
 
$
 
$
7,000
   
(3
)
$
327,510
 
Officer and Former Director
                                                 
 
                                                 
Dr. Marvin S. Hausman (5)
   
2006
 
$
52,083
   
(6
)
     
$
 
$
164,977
   
(7
)
$
208,870
 
$
 
$
     
$
425,930
 
Chairman of the Board,
   
2005
 
$
   
(6
)
     
$
 
$
     
$
10,297
 
$
 
$
15,000
   
(8
)
$
25,297
 
Chief Executive Officer
                                                 
Acting Chief
                                                 
Financial Officer
                                                 
                                                                           
Michael Centron (9)
   
2006
 
$
133,466
             
$
 
$
       
$
29,908
 
$
 
$
5,240
   
(10
)
$
168,614
 
Former Chief
   
2005
 
$
             
$
 
$
       
$
 
$
 
$
       
$
 
Financial Officer
                                                                         
                                                                           
 
 
(1)
 
Mr. Guillen served as President, Chief Executive Officer and Director from February 28, 2005 to September 15, 2006.  Mr. Guillen resigned from the board of directors on April 12, 2007.
 
(2)
 
Includes $4,250 car allowance, $2,000 for matching contribution under our 401(k) plan, $21,792 in penalties and interest paid by the Company in connection with back salary, and $1,375 paid by the Company into a medical spending account.
 
(3)
 
Includes $5,000 car allowance and $2,000 for matching contribution under our 401(k) plan.
 
(4)
 
Reflects dollar amount expensed by the company during applicable fiscal year for financial statement reporting purposes pursuant to FAS 123R. FAS 123R requires the company to determine the overall value of the options as of the date of grant based upon the Black Scholes method of valuation, and to then expense that value over the service period over which the options become exercisable (vest). As a general rule, for time in service based options, the company will immediately expense any option or portion thereof which is vested upon grant, while expensing the balance on a pro rata basis over the remaining vesting term of the option.
 
(5)
 
Dr. Hausman served as Acting Chief Executive Officer from December 8, 2004 to February 28, 2005 and as Acting Chief Financial Officer from December 8, 2004 until January 6, 2006. On September 15, 2006, Dr. Hausman was appointed as Chairman of the board of directors and our President and Chief Executive Officer.

59



 
(6)
 
Dr. Hausman did not receive a cash salary for his services as Chairman and Acting President, Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer in 2004 or 2005. See Director Compensation below for Dr. Hausman’s compensation as a director. In 2006, under the terms of Dr. Hausman’s employment agreement with us, Dr. Hausman may elect to receive his salary in the form of common stock at a price equal to 85% of the market price (the average closing price for the five trading days preceding the measurement date), or in the form of a ten year warrant to purchase 1.5 times the number of shares he would have received in the foregoing, at an exercise price equal to such market price.
 
(7)
 
Dr. Hausman was issued 330,769 shares of common stock on October 12, 2006, as payment for compensation and expenses owed by us to NW Medical Research Partners, Inc., of which Dr. Hausman is the sole member and manager. The amount owed was $67,477, and the shares were valued at approximately $0.204 per share, and are not subject to repurchase. Also includes dollar amount expensed by the company during 2006 for financial statement reporting purposes pursuant for FAS 123R in connection with a grant to Dr. Hausman of 500,000 restricted shares of common stock vesting over a 180 day period, for agreeing to serve as our Chief Executive Officer and President.
 
(8)
 
Dr. Hausman earned $15,000 pursuant to a consulting agreement with NW Medical Research Partners, Inc. Dr. Hausman is the sole member and manager of NW Medical Research Partners.
 
(9)
 
Mr. Centron served as our Chief Financial Officer from January 6, 2006 to November 15, 2006.
 
(10)
 
Includes $3,779 paid to Mr. Centron as a consultant following his departure as an employee, and $1,461 paid by the Company into a medical spending account.
 


60


Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End

The following table summarizes the amount of our executive officers’ equity-based compensation outstanding at the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006.
 
Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Options Awards
 
Stock Awards
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name
 
Number of
Securities Underlying Unexercised
Options
Exercisable
 
Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised
Options Unexercisable
 
Equity Incentive Plan Awards: Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Unearned Options
 
Option
Exercise
Price
 
Option Expiration
Date
 
Number of
Shares or
Units of
Stock
That Have
Not Vested
 
Market Value
of Shares
Or Units
That Have
Not Vested
 
Equity
Incentive
Plan Awards: Number of
Unearned
Shares, Units
or Other
Rights That
Have Not
Vested
 
Equity
Incentive Plan Awards:
Market or
Payout Value
of Unearned
Shares, Units,
or Other
Rights That
Have Not
Vested
 
 
 
(#)
 
(#)
 
(#)
 
( $ )
 
 
 
(#)
 
($)
 
(#)
 
($)
 
Steven T. Guillen
 
 
250,000
 
 
250,000
 
 
 
$
0.40
 
 
02/28/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$
 
 
 
 
  50,000
 
 
50,000
 
 
 
$
0.40
 
 
02/28/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
275,000
 
 
225,000
 
 
 
$
0.29
 
 
02/28/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dr. Marvin S. Hausman
 
 
30,000
 
 
 
 
 
0.22
 
 
06/14/12
 
 
416,667
 
$
95,833
 
 
 
$
 
 
 
 
5,000
 
 
  —
 
 
  —
 
$
  0.42
 
 
06/18/13
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11,695
 
 
  —
 
 
  —
 
$
  0.57
 
 
12/03/13
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
50,000
 
 
  —
 
 
  —
 
$
  0.59
 
 
10/11/14
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5,000
 
 
 
 
 
$
0.34
 
 
06/22/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
108,000
 
 
 
 
 
$
0.37
 
 
10/05/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
500,000
 
 
 
$
0.29
 
 
12/28/15
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
5,000
 
 
 
 
 
$
0.27
 
 
07/31/16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
495,000
 
 
 
$
0.20
 
 
11/05/16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
501,667
 
 
1,003,333
 
 
 
$
0.20
 
 
11/05/16
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                         
Michael Centron
   
150,000
   
37,500
   
 
$
0.30
   
01/05/16
                         
     
100,000
   
75,000
   
 
$
0.27
   
07/31/16
                         
 
 

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Aggregated Option Exercises During 2006 and Fiscal Year-End Option Table

The following table summarizes information regarding stock options exercised by the Named Executive Officers in 2006 and the value of unexercised “in-the-money” options they held at December 31, 2006.
 
     Shares of Common Stock Acquired       Number of Securities Underlying Unexercised Options at December 31, 2006       Value of Unexercised In-the-Monoey Options at December 31, 2006 (3)   
Name
 
on Exercise
 
Value Realized
 
Exercisable
 
Unexercisable
 
 
 
Exercisable
 
Unexercisable
 
Steven T. Guillen
       
       
   
575,000
   
525,000
   
(1
)
     
       
 
Marvin S. Hausman, M.D.
       
       
   
711,361
   
2,003,334
   
(2
)
     
$
2,508
       
7,492
 
 
 
 
(1)
 
Options for 150,000 shares of common stock became exercisable on February 28, 2006, with an additional 150,000 shares to become exercisable annually for two years after this date, so long as Mr. Guillen continues to serve in the capacity of either an employee, outside director or consultant. Options for 200,000 shares of common stock became exercisable upon grant of a non-qualified stock option on December 28, 2005. Options for an additional 75,000 shares of common stock became exercisable on December 28, 2006, and continue to become exercisable annually for three years after this date so long as Mr. Guillen continues to serve in the capacity of either an employee, outside director or consultant. Pursuant to a Settlement Agreement with Mr. Guillen dated February 12, 2007, we agreed to accelerate the vesting of Mr. Guillen’s options, which took effect in March 2007.
 
 (2)
 
Options for 12,500 shares of common stock became exercisable on October 12, 2006. Options for 5,000 shares of common stock became exercisable on June 22, 2006. Options for 9,000 shares of common stock became exercisable on January 5, 2006 and monthly for 8 months after this date. Options for 300,000 shares of common stock become exercisable on February 27, 2007. Options for 100,000 shares of common stock become exercisable on December 28, 2007 and December 28, 2008. Options for 5,000 shares become exercisable on August 1, 2007. Options for 247,500 shares become exercisable in quarterly installments starting on February 6, 2007 for a one year period; options for an additional 247,500 shares become exercisable in eight quarterly installments over the following two years. A warrant for the purchase of an aggregate of 1,505,000 shares of common stock becomes exercisable in six consecutive monthly installments beginning on November 14, 2006.
 
 (3)
 
In-the-money options represents unexercised options having a per share exercise price below $0.205, the closing price of our common stock at December 29, 2006. The value of unexercised in-the-money options equals the number of in-the-money options multiplied by the excess of $0.205 over the per-share exercise prices of the options. The value of unexercised in-the-money options at December 31, 2006, may never be realized by the option holders.
 

62


Director Compensation
 
We pay an annual fee of $4,000 to each non-employee director and an additional $1,000 to non-employee directors for serving as committee chair. During 2006, while we did not make payments under this policy, such expenses were accrued. We do not pay meeting fees but directors are reimbursed for their expenses incurred in attending meetings. Employee directors receive no other compensation as directors.
 
Under our 2003 Stock Incentive Plan, non-employee directors are automatically awarded options to purchase 30,000 shares of common stock upon becoming directors and automatically awarded options to purchase 5,000 shares of common stock annually after this date.
 
The following table represents stock options that were granted during 2006 to non-employee directors.

Director Compensation
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Name
 
Fees Earned
or Paid in
Cash (1)
 
Stock
Awards
 
Option
Awards
 
Non-Equity
Incentive Plan Compensation
 
All Other Compensation
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
S. Colin Neill
 
$
6,000
 
$
 
$
11,858
 
$
 
$
 
$
17,858
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
John E. Repine, M.D
 
$
5,000
 
$
7,785
(2)
$
21,874
(3)
$
 
$
 
$
34,659
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gary Post
 
$
5,000
 
$
 
$
101,138
(4)
$
 
$
 
$
106,138
 

 
 
 
(1)
 
Accrued but not paid.
 
  
 
(2)
 
Includes 39,925 shares of common stock valued at $7,785 on the date of the grant, as compensation under a consulting agreement between us and Dr. Repine, for the period between October 15, 2006 and December 31, 2006.
 
  
 
(3)
 
In addition to automatic annual option grants made to all directors for their service on the board, includes the value of an option for the purchase of up to 9,787 shares of common stock at an exercise price of $0.24 per share, immediately exercisable, in lieu of cash payment under a consulting agreement between us and Mr. Repine.
 
  
 
(4)
 
In addition to automatic annual option grants made to all directors for their service on the board, includes the value of following options and warrants granted to Mr. Post under an advisory agreement between us and him: (i) a ten-year option for the purchase of up to 333,333 shares of common stock, with an exercise price of $0.20 per share, which vests and becomes exercisable in six equal installments over a 180 day period beginning November 14, 2006, (ii) a ten-year warrant for the purchase of 173,608 shares of common stock, with an exercise price of $0.20 per share, fully vested and immediately exercisable, (iii) a ten-year warrant for the purchase of 550,000 shares of common stock, with an exercise price of $0.20 per share, which vests and becomes exercisable with respect to 225,000 shares in four quarterly installments from January 15, 2007 to January 15, 2008, and which vests and becomes exercisable with respect to an additional 225,000 shares in eight equal installments from January 15, 2008 to January 15, 2010, and (iv) a ten-year option for the purchase of 156,250 shares with an exercise price of $0.24 per share, fully vested and immediately exercisable.
 
 

63


Employment Agreements
 
On November 6, 2006, we entered into an employment agreement with Dr. Hausman that commenced retroactively at October 15, 2006, referred to as the commencement date. Under the terms of our agreement:
 
 
·
 
Dr. Hausman will serve as our President and Chief Executive Officer for a three year term from the commencement date of his employment, and after this period, on a year-to-year basis;
 
 ·
 
Dr. Hausman will receive annual compensation in the amount of $250,000, payable quarterly in advance in cash, common stock based on a price equal to 85% of average of the five closing prices for the five trading days prior to the date that the issuance is authorized by the board of directors, or in ten year warrants equal to that number of warrants equal to 1.5 times the number of shares that would otherwise be received;
 
 ·
 
For the initial quarterly payment, Dr. Hausman was issued 347,222 restricted shares of common stock;
 
 ·
 
During the three year term of the agreement, Dr. Hausman will receive an annual bonus based upon the attainment of agreed upon goals and milestones as determined by the board of directors and its compensation committee;
 
 ·
 
During the remainder of calendar year 2006, Dr. Hausman’s bonus will be pro rated on an annual bonus rate in the range of 25% to 50% of his base salary, and the bonus for subsequent years of the term of the agreement will be in a similar target range;
 
 ·
 
The bonuses payable will be paid in cash, although at Dr. Hausman’s sole option, they may be paid in stock (or in the form of ten year warrants with cashless exercise provisions, with 1.5 times the number of warrant shares to be issued in lieu of the number of shares of common stock), based upon the average of the closing bid and asked prices for the 5 trading days immediately prior to the awarding to Dr. Hausman of the bonus for a particular year;
 
 ·
 
Once we have raised at least $2.5 million in one or more financings (equity, debt or convertible debt, in addition to the financing closed on October 25, 2006) or in a strategic transaction, Dr. Hausman may elect, at any time, in lieu of receiving a quarterly issuance of stock (or warrants in lieu thereof), to receive his base salary in cash, payable monthly on our regular pay cycle for professional employees;
 
 ·
 
As part of his compensation, we granted Dr. Hausman a ten year a non-qualified option to purchase 495,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, vesting as follows: (i) 247,500 option shares vesting in four equal quarterly installments commencing on January 15, 2007 and every three months thereafter and (ii) and the remaining 247,500 option shares vesting in eight quarterly installments over two years;
 
 ·
 
Additionally, we granted Dr. Hausman, as a sign on bonus, 500,000 restricted shares of common stock and a ten year common stock purchase warrant to purchase 1,505,000 shares at an exercise price of $0.20 per share, with vesting in six equal installments, commencing on November 14, 2006, through the 180th day after the Commencement Date;
 
 ·
 
We are providing Dr. Hausman with an annual office expense allowance of $50,000, for the costs of maintaining an office in the Stevenson, Washington area, payable quarterly in advance in the form of common stock, at a price equal to 85% of the market price;
 
 ·
 
For the first installment, representing $12,500 of the above office expense allowance, Dr. Hausman was issued 69,444 restricted shares of common stock;
 
 ·
 
Once we have completed a qualifying financing, the above office expense allowance will be paid in cash in advance, commencing for the quarter next following the quarter in which the Qualifying Financing occurred.
 
 ·
 
Additionally, Dr. Hausman will receive family health and dental insurance benefits and short-term and long-term disability policies;

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 ·
 
Upon termination for cause, all compensation due to Dr. Hausman under the agreement will cease, other than a right to participate in continued group health insurance for a certain period of time (this applies to all terminations, except if Dr, Hausman terminates without good reason) and any unexercised portions of his stock options shall expire upon such termination;
 
 ·
 
In the event that we terminate Dr. Hausman’s employment within one year of a change of control, Dr. Hausman shall receive an amount equal to twelve months of his base salary for the then current term of the agreement (which is in addition to the base salary paid to Dr. Hausman after our delivery of notice of termination and the actual date of termination) plus an amount equal to his bonus in the prior year (and if occurring before the determination of the 2007 bonus, an amount equal to 50% of the then current base salary), and the full vesting of Dr. Hausman’s stock options, and extended exercisability of the options until their respective expiration dates.
 
 ·
 
In the event that we terminate our relationship with Dr. Hausman, including a non-renewal of the agreement by us, but other than upon a change of control, death, disability or cause, Dr. Hausman shall receive the following: (i) if employment was terminated during the calendar year 2006, an amount equal to six months of the then current base salary; if employment was terminated commencing in the calendar year 2007 or if we elect not to renew the agreement, an amount equal to twelve months of base salary for the then current term of the agreement plus an amount equal to the prior year’s bonus (and if occurring before the bonus for 2007 has been determined, an amount equal to 50% of the then current base salary); (ii) if employment was terminated during the calendar year 2006, 50% of the previously unvested portion of the Initial Option Grant shall vest and such vested options shall be exercisable until their respective expiration dates; if employment was terminated commencing in the calendar year 2007 and thereafter or if we elect not to renew the agreement following the initial three year term or any additional term, all stock options granted to Dr. Hausman (including without limitation the Initial Option Grant) shall immediately vest and shall remain exercisable until their respective expiration dates.
 
 ·
 
In the event Dr. Hausman terminates his relationship with us for good reason within one (1) year of the occurrence of the event which established good reason, or for good reason within one year of a change of control, Dr. Hausman shall receive the following: (i) if the termination occurred during the calendar year 2006 for good reason, an amount equal to six months of base salary; if the termination occurred during the calendar year 2006 due to a change of control, an amount equal to twelve months of base salary; if termination for good reason occurred during the calendar year 2007 or thereafter, an amount equal to twelve months of the then current base salary plus an amount equal to the prior year’s bonus (and if occurring before the bonus for 2007 has been determined, an amount equal to 50% of the then current base salary); (ii) if termination occurred during the calendar year 2006, 50% of the previously unvested portion of the Initial Option Grant shall vest and such vested options shall be exercisable until their respective expiration dates, except that if termination is by Dr. Hausman for good reason subsequent to a change of control, then 100% of any option grants to Dr. Hausman (including, without limitation, the Initial Option Grant) shall vest and shall remain exercisable until its respective expiration dates; if employment was terminated commencing in the calendar year 2007 and thereafter, all stock options granted to Dr. Hausman (including, without limitation, the Initial Option Grant) shall immediately vest and shall remain exercisable until their respective expiration dates.
  
On January 6, 2006 we signed a Letter Agreement with Michael D. Centron under which he would serve as our Vice President and chief financial officer. On the same day our board of directors ratified the Letter Agreement and granted stock options to Mr. Centron pursuant to the terms of the Letter Agreement. Mr. Centron resigned as an officer and employee effective November 15, 2006.
 
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On February 28, 2005, we entered into a Letter Agreement, effective as of February 28, 2005, with Steven T. Guillen under which he was hired as our President and Chief Executive Officer. On September 15, 2006, Mr. Guillen’s employment as President and Chief Executive Officer was terminated by the board of directors. On March 8, 2007, we entered into a Separation Agreement with Mr. Guillen under which, among other things, Mr. Guillen agreed to resign from the board of directors. For further information regarding related matters involving Mr. Guillen, see the section entitled “Legal Proceedings” on page 19 of this report.


66


ITEM 11. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

The following table sets forth certain information known by us with respect to the beneficial ownership of our common stock as of December 31, 2006 by (i) each person who is known by us to own beneficially more than 5% of common stock, (ii) each of the Named Executive Officers (see the section above entitled “Executive Compensation”), (iii) each of our directors and (iv) all of our current officers and directors as a group. Except as otherwise listed below, the address of each person is c/o OXIS International, Inc., 323 Vintage Park Drive, Suite B, Foster City, California 94404.

The percentage of shares beneficially owned is based on 44,527,476 shares of common stock outstanding as of December 31, 2006. Shares of common stock subject to stock options and warrants that are currently exercisable or exercisable within 60 days of December 31, 2006 are deemed to be outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of that person but are not treated as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. Unless indicated below, the persons and entities named in the table have sole voting and sole investment power with respect to all shares beneficially owned, subject to community property laws where applicable.
 Name and Address of Beneficial Owner
Number of Shares of Common Stock Beneficially Owned
  
Percent of
Shares of Outstanding Common Stock
 
TorreyPines Therapeutics, Inc. (1)
11085 N. Torrey Pines Road
La Jolla, CA 92037
 
16,386,647
 
 
36.80%
 
Bristol Investment Fund, Ltd. (2)
Bristol Capital Advisors, LLC
10990 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1410
Los Angeles, CA 90024
 
13,472,994
 
 
25.57%
 
Alpha Capital Anstalt (3)
c/o LH Financial
150 Central Park South, 2nd Floor
New York, NY 10019
 
5,737,143
 
 
12.01%
 
Whalehaven Capital Fund Limited (4)
3rd Floor, 14 Par-La-Ville Rd.
P. O. Box HM1027
Hamilton HMDX Bermuda
 
4,302,857
 
 
9.01%
 
Cranshire Capital, LP (5)
3100 Dundee Rd., Suite 703
Northbrook, IL 60062
 
4,717,791
 
 
9.99%
 
Marvin S. Hausman, M.D. (6)
 
17,410,717
  
 
38.22%
S. Colin Neill (7)
181,875
  
*
Steven T. Guillen (8)
1,175,000
 
2.61%
John E. Repine, M.D. (9)
233,387
  
0.52%
Gary M. Post (10)